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Sainte-Mère-Église in Manche, Normandie, France
 

House on Fire at Sainte-Mère-Église

 
 
House on Fire at Sainte-Mère-Église Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 18, 2012
1. House on Fire at Sainte-Mère-Église Marker
Inscription.  
Ici emplacement de la maison
incendiée le 5–6 juin 1944

Here stood the house that
was afire on 5–6 June 1944


 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, World II.
 
Location. 49° 24.509′ N, 1° 18.895′ W. Marker is in Sainte-Mère-Église, Normandie, in Manche. Marker can be reached from rue Eisenhower. Marker is not visible from the road but is on the grounds of the Airborne Museum. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14 rue Eisenhower, Sainte-Mère-Église, Normandie 50480, France. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clifford A. Maughan P.F.C. (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); In Remembrance of the Airborne Spirit (about 180 meters away); 82nd and 101st Airborne on D-Day (about 180 meters away); General Gavin’s Foxhole (approx. 3.5 kilometers away); 6 June 1944 at LaFiere Bridge (approx. 3.6 kilometers away); PFC Charles DeGlopper Memorial (approx. 3.6 kilometers away);
Marker on the Museum Grounds image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 18, 2012
2. Marker on the Museum Grounds
The modern structure in the background contains the Airborne Museum’s restrooms.
80th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion, 82nd Airborne Div. U.S. Army (approx. 3.6 kilometers away); U.S. Coast Guard Memorial at Utah Beach (approx. 10.2 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sainte-Mère-Église.
 
Regarding House on Fire at Sainte-Mère-Église. When paratroopers of the U.S. 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions arrived over Sainte-Mère-Église between midnight and 2 a.m. on D-Day, June 6, 1944, many of the C-47 pilots were guided in their approach by the light from a house on fire. (In fact, the fire may have been accidentally set when illumination flares were dropped by the first planes over the town.)

In any event, the fire-fighting commotion meant that many townsfolk, as well as occupying German soldiers, were awake and outdoors night — and stunned to see the night sky filling up with parachutes.
 
Also see . . .  Airborne Museum. (Submitted on September 25, 2012, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.)
 
Entrance of the Airborne Museum image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 18, 2012
3. Entrance of the Airborne Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2018. It was originally submitted on September 25, 2012, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 474 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 25, 2012, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 27, 2020