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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Point Marion in Fayette County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Friendship Hill

Gallatin’s Wilderness Home

 
 
Friendship Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 25, 2012
1. Friendship Hill Marker
Inscription.  Albert Gallatin bought this land in 1786 when this area was known as the “Western Country.” Three years later he constructed a two-story brick house at Friendship Hill for his new bride, Sophie. After Sophie died, Gallatin built additions to the house in 1798 in 1823 for his second wife, Hannah, and their children.

By the end of Gallatin’s ownership, Friendship Hill included a barn, a well, vegetable and pleasure gardens, an orchard, and a gardener's cottage. However since Gallatin’s political post kept him from living at Friendship Hill for years at a time, he finally sold his isolated estate in 1832.

"… the new house at [Friendship Hill] is almost completed, is well finished and ... situated on a most delightful spot … "
Albert Gallatin's son James in a letter to his sister Frances August 21, 1823
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 39° 46.572′ N, 79° 55.868′ 

Friendship Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 25, 2012
2. Friendship Hill Marker
W. Marker is near Point Marion, Pennsylvania, in Fayette County. This marker is located at the Friendship Hill National Historic site. The grounds are open from sunrise to sunset and there is no entrance fee. From the park entrance on New Geneva Rd, continue along the street to the parking lot. From the parking lot, follow the paved path up the hill. The marker will be next to the path as you approach the house. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 223 New Geneva Road, Point Marion PA 15474, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stone Cistern (within shouting distance of this marker); Preserving the 1910 Landscape (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sophia Allegre Gallatin (about 400 feet away); Monongahela River (about 400 feet away); Albert Gallatin (about 400 feet away); Old Glassworks (approx. 0.6 miles away); Greensboro (approx. 1.7 miles away); a different marker also named Old Glassworks (approx. 2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Point Marion.
 
Also see . . .
1. Friendship Hill National Historic Site. Link to the National Park Service site. (Submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

2. Friendship Hill National Historic Site. Wikipedia (Submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

3. Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin. Wikipedia (Submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
Friendship Hill and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 2, 2019
3. Friendship Hill and Marker
 
 
Statue of Albert Gallatin image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 25, 2012
4. Statue of Albert Gallatin
House at Friendship Hill image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 25, 2012
5. House at Friendship Hill
House at Friendship Hill image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 25, 2012
6. House at Friendship Hill
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 5, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 428 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on November 10, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3. submitted on September 13, 2019, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4, 5, 6. submitted on October 30, 2012, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Oct. 29, 2020