Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chalmette in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

“Where Has Our Equipment Gone?”

 
 
“Where Has Our Equipment Gone?” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bryan Olson, May 2007
1. “Where Has Our Equipment Gone?” Marker
Inscription.  When the assault on the American rampart reached its height, the main British attack force found itself in front of the 44th Regiment which should have been in lead.

Discovering that Colonel Mullens and the 44th Regiment had advanced 500 yards beyond the sugar cane bundles (fascines) and ladders stored for their use, Major General Gibbs immediately ordered Mullens to return with his men to the rear and retrieve their equipment. Mullens disappeared, and only some of his regiment returned to the front!

When Gibbs’ column moved to within 150 yards of the rampart, the American infantry began shooting. This proved to be too much for the British; their ranks broke as they returned to fire. The 44th threw down their fascines and started shooting, also, catching a large part of their own troops in the cross fire.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War of 1812.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 29° 56.494′ 
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
N, 89° 59.344′ W. Marker was in Chalmette, Louisiana, in St. Bernard Parish. Marker was on Battlefield Road, on the left when traveling north. Monument is located inside Chalmette Battlefield. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Chalmette LA 70043, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Roads and Ditches (within shouting distance of this marker); Chalmette National Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); British Batteries (about 500 feet away); Here We Honor Veterans Who Served Their Country (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pakenham's Fall (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Main Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fazendeville (approx. 0.2 miles away); The 93rd Oblique (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chalmette.
 
More about this marker. On the right, two illustration depict scenes from the battle. On the lower left a map shows British movements on the north side of the battlefield, captioned During this hectic period Major General Gibbs was shot and killed.
 
Additional keywords. Battle of New Orleans, Chalmette Battlefield
 
“Where Has Our Equipment Gone?” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bryan Olson, May 2007
2. “Where Has Our Equipment Gone?” Marker
A Panoramic View Of The Battlefield image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bryan Olson, May 2007
3. A Panoramic View Of The Battlefield
From here you have a panoramic view of the battlefield from the British perspective. On the far left, Col. Robert Rennie’s attack reached and briefly overran the American rampart. On the right, Gibbs’s men met disaster near the edge of the swamp. In the center of the field murderous artillery and small-arms fire mowed down the Highlanders. General Pakenham rode past here to inspire his troops for new assaults. (NPS)
Bird's-eye view of the battle image. Click for full size.
Latour (Artist). From Lossing, B.J "The pictorial field-book of the War of 1812…" New York, 1869,
4. Bird's-eye view of the battle
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 14, 2023. It was originally submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 2,152 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 15, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York.   4. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=6248

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
U.S. FTC REQUIRED NOTICE: This website earns income from purchases you make after using links to Amazon.com. Thank you.
Paid Advertisements
Feb. 26, 2024