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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Chalmette in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Batteries 5 and 6

 
 
Batteries 5 and 6 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 2007
1. Batteries 5 and 6 Marker
Inscription.  Fire from these positions played an important role in stopping the British attack on January 8, 1815. The cannons displayed here represent batteries 5 and 6, which defended the center of Major general Jackson’s line. The field carriages were painted in U.S. Army regulation colors- sky blue and black.

Battery 6 contained guns mounted on a more compact mobile naval carriage. These carriages were painted in U.S Navy regulation “Spanish red” and black.

Artillery at New Orleans

The artillery used at the Battle of New Orleans was of three basic types: guns, howitzers, and mortars.

Guns (As in Batteries 5 and 6) were most common. They were long-barreled weapons that fired solid shot, grape shot, and canister on relatively flat trajectories. Although the range was over a mile for most guns, their accuracy decreased rapidly at ranges greater than 500 yards.

Howitzers (one was in battery 1) had shorter barrels. They fired shell, grape shot, and canister on an arcing trajectory. Ranges rarely exceeded 800 yards.

Mortars (present, but not used in the battle)
The American Rampart image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 2007
2. The American Rampart
Batteries 5 and 6, along with Batteries 7 and 8 to the northeast anchoring the left flank of Jackson’s line, helped to stop Gibbs’s advancing column on January 8. The cannon in battery 5 are reproductions of the two six ponders used here the day of the battle.(NPS)
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had extremely short barrels. They fired shells on very high angled arcs and were useful against troops behind fortifications. If the British had mortars available, American losses would have been much higher.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War of 1812. A significant historical date for this entry is January 8, 1815.
 
Location. 29° 56.7′ N, 89° 59.549′ W. Marker is in Chalmette, Louisiana, in St. Bernard Parish. Marker is on Battlefield Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Chalmette LA 70043, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Batteries Five and Six (within shouting distance of this marker); Batteries Seven and Eight (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle Of New Orleans 200th Anniversary (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chalmette Battlefield And National Cemetery (about 600 feet away); Battery Four (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery 4 (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Kentucky Rifle (approx. 0.2 miles away); Chalmette Battlefield (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chalmette.
 
More about this marker. The center illustration on the marker shows The guns at Battery 5 were manned by U.S. Regular artillerymen. A map on the left details the disposition of U.S. troops and batteries. On the right a drawing illustrates the differences of the three weapon classes described.
 
Additional keywords. Battle of New Orleans, Chalmette Battlefield
 
An American Gun image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 2007
3. An American Gun
Guns were most common. They were long-barreled weapons that fired solid shot, grape shot, and canister on relatively flat trajectories. Although the range was over a mile for most guns, their accuracy decreased rapidly at ranges greater than 500 yards.
An American Gun mounted on a mobile naval carriage image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 2007
4. An American Gun mounted on a mobile naval carriage
These carriages were painted in U.S Navy regulation “Spanish red” and black.
The American Rampart, looking South image. Click for full size.
By Bryan Olson, May 2007
5. The American Rampart, looking South
The Battle of New Orleans image. Click for full size.
6. The Battle of New Orleans
Painting by E. Percy Moran, "The Battle of New Orleans," on January 9, 1815, the climactic battle in the War of 1812 and the early career of General Andrew Jackson.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 19, 2017. It was originally submitted on March 16, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 1,739 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 16, 2008, by Bryan Olson of Syracuse, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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Dec. 6, 2021