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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Parrott Ropewalk

 
 
Parrott Ropewalk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
1. Parrott Ropewalk Marker
Inscription.  Here the Richard Parrott Ropewalk manufactured rope and rigging used on sailing vessels that plied their trade in old Georgetown through the early 19th Century.

The ropewalk receives its name from the long path used for the laying out of individual yarns of rope prior to twisting them together.

Rope making was accomplished by first combing hemp and attaching it to a clockwise revolving hook spinning it into yarns.

Several yarns were then attached to separate hooks and twisted together counterclockwise to form strands. These three strands were twisted together clockwise again making rope.

Because of the constant change in direction, the rope would not unravel. If a larger rope was needed, three ropes could be twisted together to form anchor cable.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce.
 
Location. 38° 54.781′ N, 77° 3.647′ W. Marker is in Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of R Street Northwest and Avon Place Northwest, on the
Parrott Ropewalk Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
2. Parrott Ropewalk Marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
left when traveling east. Marker is in Montrose Park in Georgetown Heights. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3048 R Street Northwest, Washington DC 20007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Montrose Park (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Watching the Flames (about 700 feet away); Dumbarton Oaks (about 700 feet away); Lillie Mackall (approx. 0.2 miles away); South Lawn (approx. 0.2 miles away); Garage (approx. 0.2 miles away); "Evermay" (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Presbyterian Congregation in George Town (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Elderslie, Parrott's Woods and the Ropewalk
Industrialist Richard Parrott put together a large property here between 1804 and 1813. He built a ropewalk and a Federal Style mansion house he called Elderslie. The area around including the grounds of Oak Hill Cemetery came to be known as "Parrott's Woods." The property passed to Clement Smith in 1822 when Parrott died. In 1837 it became the property of Mary McEwan Boyce and later the property of her husband Captain William Boyce. The Boyce's named the the place Montrose. In 1911 the property became Montrose Park after extensive lobbying by Sarah Rittenhouse. The decaying house was torn down and formal grounds were designed by George Burnap and Horace
Ropewalk image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 15, 2013
3. Ropewalk
The wooden "top" keeps the strands separate until they are twisted together.
Close-up of image on marker
Peaslee under supervision by the Commission on the Fine Arts and Frederick Law Olmstead.
    — Submitted September 16, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
 
Some common types of rope image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
4. Some common types of rope
Hauser Laid 3 strands laid right-handed or "with the sun".
Shroud Laid 4 strands with the sun.
Cable Laid 3 strands of 3 yarns each laid against the sun.
==============
A Strand is made of two or more rope yarns.
Close-up of image on marker
The Armillary Sphere at Montrose Park image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
5. The Armillary Sphere at Montrose Park
In Tribute to
Sarah Louisa
Rittenhouse

1845 - 1942
Through her Vision and Perseverance this land became Montrose Park (It appears that "Perseverance" was originally spelled "Perseverence" and corrected.)

This memorial erected by the Georgetown Garden Club in 1956 marks the location of the old mansion house.
Montrose Park<br>1911 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
6. Montrose Park
1911
United States Department of the Interior
National Park Service.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 12, 2019. It was originally submitted on September 16, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 659 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 16, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Sep. 23, 2021