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Long Branch in Monmouth County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

James A. Garfield

 
 
President Garfield Death Site Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By R. C.
1. President Garfield Death Site Marker
A special train track was laid just to bring the dying president to his summer home in Long Branch, NJ so he could die by the ocean.
Inscription.  
James A. Garfield
Twentieth President of
The United States
Born Nov 19, 1831 at Orange, Ohio
Died on this site, Sept. 19, 1881.

 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Government & Politics. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #20 James A. Garfield series list. A significant historical month for this entry is September 1902.
 
Location. 40° 15.833′ N, 73° 59.25′ W. Marker is in Long Branch, New Jersey, in Monmouth County. Marker is at the intersection of Garfield Road and Ocean Court on Garfield Road. Marker is on the boundary of a private residence near the intersection of the two streets. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Long Branch NJ 07740, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Church of the Presidents (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dorothy Parker Birthplace (approx. 1.1 miles away); Corner of Ocean and Brighton Avenues (approx. 1˝ miles away); Brinley Grist Mill (approx. 1.7 miles away); a different marker also named Brinley Grist Mill (approx. 1.7 miles
View of Garfield Marker from street. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By R. C.
2. View of Garfield Marker from street.
Click or scan to see
this page online
away); Historic Site of Old Free Church Cemetery (approx. 1.8 miles away); Norman Mailer/Scarboro Hotel (approx. 2 miles away); New Era Anchor (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Long Branch.
 
Regarding James A. Garfield. Although he was shot with a pistol by Charles Guiteau, most historians and medical experts believe it was inept doctors who encouraged conditions leading to infection in Garfield's wounds that actually caused his death.
 
Also see . . .
1. James A. Garfield. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.) 

2. Assassination of James A. Garfield. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on March 11, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

3. Assassins. Wikipedia entry:
Stephen Sondheim's musical Assassins includes the story of Charles J. Guiteau and his assassination of Garfield and features a song, "The Ballad of Guiteau." (Submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.) 

4. James Abram Garfield. Find A Grave entry (Submitted on September 16, 2013, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Additional keywords.
James A. Garfield Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Coughlin, August 16, 2014
3. James A. Garfield Marker
President Garfield Death Site
 
Federal Crest at top of marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By R. C.
4. Federal Crest at top of marker
James A. Garfield image. Click for full size.
via Find A Grave, unknown
5. James A. Garfield
President Garfield's summer home was once on this site. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By R. C.
6. President Garfield's summer home was once on this site.
President James A. Garfield's Cottage image. Click for full size.
via Huffpost, unknown
7. President James A. Garfield's Cottage
Top: After Garfield's attempted assassination, he was surrounded by his family and positioned to see the ocean. He told his doctors, “It is refreshing to get where I can look at the sea.” He observed the fisherman, the boats and the bathers and whispered, “I am myself again.”
Bottom: Crowds gathered one afternoon to watch the president’s train inch toward the cottage. The original engine was too heavy for the track, so workers switched Garfield's car to a smaller engine. When that stalled, 200 railroad workers pushed it the last few hundred yards to the cottage door. The tea house, which was built from the railroad tiles from the aforementioned endeavor, is currently undergoing preservation efforts on the Long Branch Historical Museum grounds on which it now rests.
The Cottage at Long Branch image. Click for full size.
via Walmart, unknown
8. The Cottage at Long Branch
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 11, 2021. It was originally submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,407 times since then and 79 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.   3. submitted on August 17, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of Woodland Park, New Jersey.   4. submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.   5. submitted on March 11, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   6. submitted on April 4, 2008, by R. C. of Shrewsbury, New Jersey.   7, 8. submitted on March 11, 2021, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Aug. 13, 2022