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The National Mall in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Washington Monument

National Mall and Memorial Parks

 

— National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
Washington Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard E. Miller, December 24, 2013
1. Washington Monument Marker
Inscription.  
On August 23, 2011, a 5.8 magnitude earthquake occurred 84 miles southwest of Washington, D.C. As the earth shook, the Washington Monument sustained significant damage to many of its marble and granite blocks.

Although the monument remains structurally sound, internal and external stone damage was discovered in many areas. Most occurred in the top fifty feet of the monument, the pyramidion, which suffered cracks to marble panels, tie beams, and rib bearing haunches, as well as displacement of rib stones. Emergency teams waterproofed cracks and removed loose stone for safety.

Close-up of earthquake-damaged stonework and a diagram showing the extent of damaged exterior stone on the east face of the Monument.

Photo captions:

Preparation and Repairs:
To facilitate Washington Monument repairs, a temporary access road and scaffolding in place.

Accessing damage in September 2012

Repairs are expected to be completed in 2014. National Mall and Memorial Parks
 
Erected 2013 by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
Washington Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard E. Miller, December 25, 2013
2. Washington Monument Marker
This marker is on the same spot as one of three National Park Service markers entitled: "Why Is The Washington Monument Temporarily Closed" (2012). Photographed from the same direction, the nighttime view of the nearby tree and the Washington Monument's remaining scaffold in the background of this photo match the daylight perspective in the photos for HMDB No. 53727.
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Topics. This historical marker and monument is listed in these topic lists: DisastersNotable EventsPatriots & Patriotism. A significant historical month for this entry is September 2012.
 
Location. 38° 53.513′ N, 77° 2.038′ W. Marker is in Northwest Washington in Washington, District of Columbia. It is in The National Mall. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Constitution Avenue Northwest (U.S. 50) and 15th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20230, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Washington City Canal on the Tiber Creek (within shouting distance of this marker); Bulfinch Gate House (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: A Gathering Place (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: Specimens of Global, Scholarly and Public Research (within shouting distance of this marker); Live Oaks: A Symbol of Strength (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sheltering Branches (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Sheltering Branches (about 500 feet away); German-American Friendship Garden (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Northwest Washington.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
Washington Monument with its earthquake repairs mostly completed and its scaffolding mostly removed image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Richard E. Miller, December 9, 2013
3. Washington Monument with its earthquake repairs mostly completed and its scaffolding mostly removed
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 30, 2023. It was originally submitted on December 27, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 599 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 27, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on March 30, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 9, 2023