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Wheeling in Ohio County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Pennsylvania Depot

Access to the Prosperous East

 
 
Pennsylvania Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
1. Pennsylvania Depot Marker
Inscription.  
The mighty Pennsylvania Railroad rolled into Wheeling on February 24, 1878. It provided access north to Pittsburgh and south to Parkersburg for Wheeling's industrial products. It also enabled Wheeling's farmers and manufacturers to increase trade with the East. Many of Wheeling's young men waved goodbye to their mothers and sweethearts for the last time from the Water Street depot before going off to World War I and World War II.

[Captions:]
❶ In 1846, a group of merchants from Philadelphia created the Pennsylvania Railroad in hopes of creating a 249-mile trunk rout from Philly to Pittsburgh. The rails stretched 11,000 miles across the Allegheny Mountains and through New York, Wheeling, Chicago, and St. Louis. At its height, the Pennsylvania Railroad was the world's largest with 250,000 cares and 7,000 locomotives. By the middle of the 20th century, the Pennsylvania Railroad was the largest transportation enterprise in the United States.

❷ The old Pennsylvania passenger and freight station was located on Water Street at 11th Street. The Pennsylvania line to Wheeling was important
Pennsylvania Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), April 22, 2022
2. Pennsylvania Depot Marker
Unfortunately, the marker has significantly weathered.
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because the valuable Ohio Valley trade had formerly been monopolized by the B & O Railroad. In 1883, the Pennsylvania Railroad added a four mile extension from Wheeling to the profitable iron works at Benwood.

❸ This was one of the worst to hit Wheeling. Reaching a height of 50.1 feet, it caused a number of deaths by drowning and fire. This passenger train was caught at the station in the fast rising waters and could not move. The passengers on board were removed and put up in the local hotels until the flood receded, and a new train was brought in.

 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: DisastersRailroads & Streetcars. In addition, it is included in the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) series list. A significant historical month for this entry is February 1812.
 
Location. 40° 4.124′ N, 80° 43.481′ W. Marker is in Wheeling, West Virginia, in Ohio County. Marker can be reached from Wheeling Heritage Trail. Marker is on the Wheeling Heritage Trail behind (west of) 1063 Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wheeling WV 26003, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Mass in West Virginia (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memoriam (within shouting distance of this marker); Gold Star Families Memorial Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Congressional Medal of Honor
Pennsylvania Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
3. Pennsylvania Depot Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Henry (within shouting distance of this marker); The Siege of Fort Henry (within shouting distance of this marker); Warwick China Co. Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wheeling.
 
Pennsylvania Depot Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, December 30, 2013
4. Pennsylvania Depot Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2022. It was originally submitted on January 8, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 562 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on January 8, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on April 24, 2022, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4. submitted on January 8, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 9, 2023