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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

King Street

 
 
King Street Marker, top left image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
1. King Street Marker, top left
Inscription.  This marker consists of six plaques arranged in a 2 X 3 pattern. The top left plaque is the title plaque and may contain some text. The top right plaque displayed an arrow which points in the direction of the named street. Other plaques contain biographical information on the person for whom the street is named, appropriate quotation(s) and relevant illustrations, cast in bronze.

In February of 1853, the United States Topographical Engineers published their first detailed survey of the city, showing new streets, many named for army and navy officers. Fremont and Folsom were prominent officers; Harrison, Bryant and King held important city and port positions’ Spear and Brannon had been pioneers in Yerba Buena before San Francisco has its name.

Agent for the United States government before California became part of the Union, T. Butler King helped build the foundations of California’s polity. Advisor to President Zachary Taylor, he was appointed Collector of the Port of San Francisco in 1850. His carefully considered observations on the Gold Rush were nationally influential. After an unsuccessful attempt to return to
King Street Marker, center left image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
2. King Street Marker, center left
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Washington as a Senator from California, he retired to his home in Georgia and later served as a Commissioner of the Confederacy to Europe.

“So much are our opinions influenced by early impressions, the vicissitudes of the seasons with which we are familiar, love of country, home, and kindred, that we ought never to hazard a hasty opinion, when we come in contact with circumstances entirely different from those to which we have all our lives been accustomed.” -- T. Butler King
 
Erected by San Francisco Art Commission for the Waterfront Transportation Projects.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Roads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #12 Zachary Taylor series list. A significant historical month for this entry is February 1853.
 
Location. 37° 46.795′ N, 122° 23.393′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is on King Street near 2nd Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 102 King Street, San Francisco CA 94107, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Orlando Manuel Cepeda (within shouting distance of this marker); Gaylord Jackson Perry (within shouting distance of this marker); San Francisco Giants Wall of Fame (within shouting distance of this marker); Stu Miller
King Street Marker, center right image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
3. King Street Marker, center right
(within shouting distance of this marker); Orlando Cepeda (within shouting distance of this marker); Tom Haller (within shouting distance of this marker); Bobby Bolin (within shouting distance of this marker); Felipe Alou (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
King Street Marker, bottom left image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
4. King Street Marker, bottom left
King Street Marker, bottom right plaque image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
5. King Street Marker, bottom right plaque
King Street Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2014
6. King Street Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 10, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 24, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 786 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 24, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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May. 22, 2022