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Near Warsaw in Kosciusko County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Lincoln Highway

The Path of Progress

 
 
The Lincoln Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane Hall, March 18, 2014
1. The Lincoln Highway Marker
Inscription.  The Lincoln Highway was the first “Coast to Coast” transcontinental highway in the United States constructed from 1913 to 1928 beginning at Times Square in New York City and ending in Lincoln Park in San Francisco. The route spanned almost 3,400 miles passing through 13 states New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California. The 1928 re-alignment brought the path through the northern tip of West Virginia. The Lincoln Highway is one of America’s best known roads inspired by the “Good Roads Movement” and affectionately known as “The Main Street America”.


“Lincoln is far and away the greatest and most American of Americans. He represented the whole people, the commons. Therefore the most suitable monument to him would be some work intimately to be used and enjoyed by the largest number of people. Nothing would better fill the requirement than a road, a broad highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The Lincoln Highway is original. It breathes the twentieth century. It is an inspiration. In centuries to come it
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would be adorned, as was the Appian way, with landmarks, statuary, homes, inns, a vast chain of splendid marks of man. It would be the path of progress, the river course of humanity, part of the golden girdle of the earth. It would liberate the farmer from the shackles of bad roads, as the Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves.”

Dr. Frank Crane, 1914
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Roads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Lincoln Highway series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1913.
 
Location. 41° 14.85′ N, 85° 54.637′ W. Marker is near Warsaw, Indiana, in Kosciusko County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Old U.S. 30 and County Road N350W, on the right when traveling east. Marker is at the west end of the Chinworth Bridge Trailhead park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Warsaw IN 46580, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chinworth Bridge Trailhead (here, next to this marker); Indiana ... Where It All Began! (here, next to this marker); Chinworth Bridge (a few steps from this marker); Highland Cemetery (approx. 2.2 miles away); Tony Elliott (approx. 2.6 miles away); a different marker also named The Lincoln Highway
Route of Lincoln Highway image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane Hall, March 18, 2014
2. Route of Lincoln Highway
Close-up of map on marker
(approx. 2.6 miles away); M3A3 Stuart Tank (approx. 2.8 miles away); Kosciusko County War Memorial (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Warsaw.
 
Also see . . .  Lincoln Highway Association Official Website. (Submitted on March 24, 2014.)
 
The Lincoln Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Duane Hall, March 18, 2014
3. The Lincoln Highway Marker
Old U.S. 30, the Lincoln Highway, behind marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on March 24, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 641 times since then and 42 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 24, 2014, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

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Apr. 22, 2024