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Brightwood in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Never Again Such Homes At the Price!

Battleground to Community

 

— Brightwood Heritage Trail —

 
Never Again Such Homes At the Price! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 18, 2013
1. Never Again Such Homes At the Price! Marker
Inscription.  
We have Harry Wardman to thank for the rich variety of Sheridan Street rowhouses. Wardman, considered Washington's most prolific developer, built hundreds of offices, apartments, hotels, and comfortable rowhouses from 1899 to 1939. When he decided to sell some land he owned here along Sheridan Street, the purchasers hired a "Who's Who" of the era's best architects, resulting in an array of building styles.

Wardman kept two parcels, for which his chief architect Turkish-trained Mihran Mesrobian, employed two different styles. At numbers 1370-1378 are five Tudor style houses. Advertisements in 1934 boasted of the latest features: six rooms, two baths, sleeping porch, breakfast porch, fireplace, and built-in garage. Mesrobian gave Georgian touches to the roof lines and front porches of 1356-1368. With paneled recreation rooms and then-generous eight-cubic-foot refrigerators, they sold quickly.

Wardman lost much of his fortune at the beginning of the Great Depression in 1929, but by the early 1930s was back in business. The houses on Sheridan Street were among the last he built before his death in 1938.

Among
Never Again Such Homes At the Price! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 18, 2013
2. Never Again Such Homes At the Price! Marker
Colonial Revival (Mesrobian) house behind
Sheridan Street's styles is Colonial Revival, chosen for 1334-1346 by Clarence Harding, who was noted for designing the old Woodward and Lothrop Department Store on F Street. Arthur Brodie designed the houses at 1320-1332 in the Art Deco style. Charles Dillon used the Romantic style for numbers 1300 to 1308. And George T. Santmyers, who contributed buildings to Washington from 1914 until 1960, designed 1339-1391 Sheridan in the Popular English cottage and craftsman styles.

Sheridan Street's architectural styles include English Cottage by Santmyers on this side of the street, to your left. Across the street are Mesrobian's Tudor style houses followed by his Colonial Revival houses; Brodies eclectic houses with Art Deco details; ending with Dillon's Romantic style houses.
 
Erected 2008 by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 9.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Art Deco, and the Brightwood Heritage Trail series lists.
 
Location. 38° 57.972′ N, 77° 1.95′ W. Marker is in Brightwood in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is on Sheridan Street Northwest east of 14th Street Northwest, on the right when
Tudor Rowhouses (Mesrobian) image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 18, 2013
3. Tudor Rowhouses (Mesrobian)
traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1381 Sheridan Street, Washington DC 20011, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Early Entrepreneurs (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); What a Beautiful Location, Brightwood (approx. 0.2 miles away); An African American Enclave (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens (approx. 0.2 miles away); Scale Model of Fort Stevens (approx. ¼ mile away); Fort Stevens (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Fort Stevens (approx. ¼ mile away); Aunt Betty's Story (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brightwood.
 
Also see . . .  Brightwood Heritage Trail. (Submitted on March 31, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2021. It was originally submitted on March 30, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 603 times since then. Last updated on April 6, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 30, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A photo of the marker reverse. • Can you help?
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Mar. 7, 2021