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Plymouth in Plymouth County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Alexander Scammell

 
 
Alexander Scammell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Connors, June 14, 2020
1. Alexander Scammell Marker
Inscription.  
Alexander Scammell
1747 -- 1781
Teacher Soldier Patriot
He taught the public school on this site
Colonel and Adjutant General in the
Continental Army
mortally wounded at Yorktown

This memorial dedicated by the
General Society Sons of the Revolution
June 1, 1923

 
Erected 1923 by General Society Sons of the Revolution.
 
Topics. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary.
 
Location. 41° 57.343′ N, 70° 39.904′ W. Marker is in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in Plymouth County. Memorial is on School Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Plymouth MA 02360, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Alden (here, next to this marker); Burial Hill (a few steps from this marker); Edward Doty (a few steps from this marker); Elder William Brewster (a few steps from this marker); The Church of Scrooby Leyden and the Mayflower
Alexander Scammell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
2. Alexander Scammell Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Unitarian Controversy of 1801 (within shouting distance of this marker); Metacomet (King Philip) (within shouting distance of this marker); Tercentenary Cannons (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Plymouth.
 
More about this marker. This bronze plaque mounted on a granite stone is located on Burial Hill, near the site of a school where Alexander Scammell taught before the U.S. Revolutionary War.
 
Regarding Alexander Scammell. Alexander Scammell was born in 1744 in Massachusetts and graduated from Harvard College. He taught school in Plymouth County, including a school near this site at the heart of the Plymouth Colony. He later became and attorney and surveyor before joining the Continental Army at the start of the U.S. Revolutionary War as a major in the 2nd New Hampshire Regiment.

In December of 1776 he was promoted to Colonel and put in charge of the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment. Scammell was a close friend of Gen. George Washington and crossed the Delaware River with him, often rallying the troops ahead of Washington in the battles of Trenton and Princeton. He and his regiment wintered with Washington at Valley Forge where Washington appointed him as Adjutant General.

On May 17, 1781, Scammell was assigned command of a light infantry detachment that became known
Alexander Scammell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
3. Alexander Scammell Marker
as Scammell's Light Infantry. Scammell led his brigade in the the Battle of King's Bridge, and then as the leading vanguard for the Army's march to Yorktown.

General Scammell was shot on September 30, 1781, while on patrol as Officer of the Day near Yorktown, and was transported to Williamsburg for treatment where he succumbed to his his injuries on Oct. 6, 1781, making him the highest ranking American officer killed during the Siege of Yorktown.
 
Alexander Scammell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson
4. Alexander Scammell Marker
Alexander Scammell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Wilson, January 8, 2011
5. Alexander Scammell Marker
Alexander Scammell image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
6. Alexander Scammell
From The Magazine of American History, Vol. X. No. 2, August 1883.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 2, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 24, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 437 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 17, 2020, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 24, 2014, by Larry Wilson of Wareham, Massachusetts.   6. submitted on October 25, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 7, 2021