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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Bethesda in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad

 
 
Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
1. Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker
Inscription.  In 1890, the Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad ran along Old Georgetown Road to Bethesda Park, a favorite amusement spot in the area. The park entrance was located on the corner of what is now Old Georgetown Road and Sonoma Road.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: EntertainmentRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 38° 59.209′ N, 77° 5.904′ W. Marker is in Bethesda, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Old Georgetown Road (Maryland Route 187) just east of Arlington Road, on the right when traveling east. Marker is in Chevy Chase Gardens Plaza near 7700 Old Georgetown Road, Bethesda MD 20814, United States of America. Also accessible from 7605 Arlington Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7605 Arlington Road, Bethesda MD 20814, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Georgetown Road (here, next to this marker); Locust Grove (within shouting distance of this marker); This Complex of Buildings and Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also
Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
2. Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker
named Old Georgetown Road (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bank of Bethesda Building (about 400 feet away); Looking North up Wisconsin Avenue at Old Georgetown Road in 1940 (about 500 feet away); The First Building for the Bethesda Fire Department (about 500 feet away); Bethesda - Chevy Chase Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bethesda.
 
Additional comments.
1. Bethesda Park
"Bethesda Park was founded as a trolley park in Montgomery County by entrepreneurs Richard Drum and John Beall in 1891. The 50-acre park featured flying horses, swings, a shooting gallery, a dance hall, a zoo, and an indoor botanical garden. By its second season, its owners had added a restaurant and a $10,000 carousel. A roller coaster and Ferris wheel soon followed, as did a variety of midway games, a theater, and a bowling alley. An electrical fire caused the park's demise in 1894." -- Jason Rhodes Maryland's Amusement Parks, 2005, page 8.
    — Submitted April 28, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring,
Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
3. Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad Marker
Maryland.
 
Old Georgetown Road and Sonoma Road image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 17, 2014
4. Old Georgetown Road and Sonoma Road
The location of the Amusement park entrance.
Woman's Club of Bethesa image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 17, 2014
5. Woman's Club of Bethesa
at the corner of Sonoma and Old Georgetown
Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 13, 2012
6. Tennallytown and Rockville Railroad
In the 1890's Tenallytown trolley cars, such as this one, made their way from Georgetown to the District boundary at Western Avenue using overhead electric power. An elaborate underground electric system was required for all downtown trolley systems; however at that time, Georgetown was not considered 'downtown.'
Close-up of photo on "Trolley to Trail" Marker HMdb No. 61805
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 22, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 28, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 455 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 28, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jul. 2, 2020