Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Princeton in Caldwell County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Black Patch War

 
 
Black Patch War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
1. Black Patch War Marker
Inscription.  
Here on December 1, 1906, began Black Patch War, which lasted to the end of 1908. “Night Riders” fought against non-cooperative farmers and businessmen who opposed the dark tobacco pool.
 
Erected 2005 by Glenn E. Martin, Kentucky Historical Society and Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 145.)
 
Topics and series. This memorial is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsHorticulture & ForestryIndustry & Commerce. In addition, it is included in the Kentucky Historical Society series list.
 
Location. 37° 6.542′ N, 87° 52.936′ W. Marker is in Princeton, Kentucky, in Caldwell County. Memorial is at the intersection of North Harrison Street and West Main Street, on the left when traveling south on North Harrison Street. Marker is near the sidewalk at the southwest corner of the Caldwell County Courthouse, Courthouse Square, Princeton, Kentucky. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 East Market Street, Princeton KY 42445, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this
Black Patch War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
2. Black Patch War Marker

Wide view of the marker, near the southwest corner of Kentucky's Caldwell County Courthouse.
marker. Courthouse Burned (within shouting distance of this marker); County Named, 1809 (within shouting distance of this marker); William Prince, 1752-1810 / Founder of Princeton (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Shandy Hall (Princeton) (about 500 feet away); Trail of Tears (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Shandy Hall (Princeton) (about 600 feet away); Ogden Memorial United Methodist Church (about 800 feet away); Princeton First Baptist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Princeton.
 
Also see . . .
1. War in the Black Patch (1906-1911).
During the period between 1900 and 1906 trouble began to brew among the tobacco men of the state, especially in the Black Patch area around Hopkinsville. the buyers had formed a trust and were controlling the market. (Submitted on November 25, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Violence, Religion and the Black Patch War, 1904-1914.
The Black Patch region of Kentucky and Tennessee which took its name from the dark, heavy-leafed, fire-cured tobacco grown in the area, contained the proper human and physical characteristics to make it one of the major growing regions in the United States by 1900. (Submitted on November 25, 2014.) 
 
Black Patch War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
3. Black Patch War Marker

Close view of the marker showing courthouse architecture detail.
Black Patch War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
4. Black Patch War Marker

View of marker looking toward West Main Street. Both sides of the marker are identical. Caldwell County's Veterans Memorial is visible in the left background.
Caldwell County Heritage Trails Mural image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
5. Caldwell County Heritage Trails Mural

The County Heritage Trails mural, across the street from the courthouse on North Jefferson Street, depicts significant events in county history including the Black Patch War.
Caldwell County Heritage Trails Mural (legend) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
6. Caldwell County Heritage Trails Mural (legend)

Mural #3 depicts War in the Black Patch
War in the Black Patch (Mural #3) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
7. War in the Black Patch (Mural #3)

Depicts early 1900s tobacco war in western Kentucky. Dark tobacco is the name for the black patch region of western Kentucky.

Portraits:

James B. Duke, owner of the tobacco monopoly;

Dr. David Amoss, a local country doctor known as “The General” by the Night Riders;

A Kentucky Night Rider militant masked farmer who rode by night to intimidate farmers;
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on November 25, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 366 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 25, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 3, 2020