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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Mammoth Cave in Edmonson County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Engine No. 4

 
 
Engine No. 4 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2012
1. Engine No. 4 Marker
Inscription.  
The Mammoth Cave Railroad Company used four 04-2T-type “dummy” engines to pull cars along its branch line. Steam engines work by burning fuel to heat water to produce steam under high pressure. The pressurized steam is then channeled through a valve into a piston, forcing the piston to move the wheels.

Deceptively strong for their small size, these locomotives pulled coaches laden with passengers and freight up and down the hills and hollows between Glasgow Junction and Mammoth Cave. The most famous of these engines, No. 3, came to be known as “Hercules.” But even Hercules had trouble going uphill when mischievous local boys soaped the rails…
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 37° 11.064′ N, 86° 5.932′ W. Marker is near Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, in Edmonson County. Marker is within
Marker detail: Engineer, Conductor and Fireman image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: Engineer, Conductor and Fireman
An engineer, conductor, and fireman made up the crew of the train. These men ran the train in 1906.

R. A. Hatcher • Conductor
P. J. Moran • Engineer
B. H. Age • Fireman
Mammoth Cave National park, along the Mammoth Cave Railroad Trail. This 9-mile bicycle and hiking recreational trail follows the old Mammoth Cave Railroad bed. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Mammoth Cave KY 42259, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Mammoth Cave Railroad (a few steps from this marker); World Treasure Saved (approx. 0.2 miles away); Old Guide's Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mammoth Cave National Park (approx. ¼ mile away); Stephen Tyng Mather (approx. ¼ mile away); The Trestle and the Highway (approx. 1.4 miles away); Mammoth Cave Railroad Bike & Hike Trail (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Forest Returns (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mammoth Cave.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. The Mammoth Cave Railroad (1886-1931)
 
Marker detail: Engine image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Engine
A "cow-catcher" on the front of the train prevented objects on the track from being drawn under the wheels.

At the rear of the engine were reservoirs for water and for coal, to keep the steam engine running. The water reservoir surrounded the coal reservoir in a u-shape.
Marker detail: Combination Car image. Click for full size.
4. Marker detail: Combination Car
The combination car had compartments for travelers and their baggage, and for freight.

A wood-burning stove kept the passenger compartment warm in cool weather.
Engine No. 4 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2012
5. Engine No. 4
(located beside marker)
Engine No. 4 Coal and Water Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2012
6. Engine No. 4 Coal and Water Reservoir
(located beside marker)
Engine No. 4 image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 6, 2012
7. Engine No. 4
(located beside marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 18, 2020. It was originally submitted on November 28, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 336 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on December 1, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1. submitted on November 28, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on August 18, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Oct. 1, 2020