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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Adams Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations

History Lives

 

— Adams Morgan Heritage Trail —

 
Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
1. Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations Marker
Inscription.  When Poland declared its independence in 1918 after 123 years or foreign partition, the first prime minister of independent Poland — Ignacy Jan Paderewski — sent Prince Kazimierz Lubomirski to Washington as the country's first diplomatic envoy. Prince Lubomirski purchased this building from Senator John B. and Mary Foote Henderson on behalf of the Polish government.

Poland and the United States agreed to elevate their respective diplomatic missions from legations to embassies in 1930. Tytus Filipowicz, Poland's first ambassador to the United States, transformed the embassy into a thriving center of political and cultural life.

During World War II, Washington continued to recognize Poland as a sovereign nation, with Ambassador Jan Ciechanowski as Poland's representative. Ciechanowski guided the embassy through the horrors of war that claimed the live so six million Polish citizens, half of them Jews. After the war, he was forced to surrender the embassy to representatives of Poland's newly established communist government.

Over the course of 45 years of Cold War, the 10-million-strong Polish American
Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
2. Polish-U.S. Diplomatic Relations Marker
community boycotted the embassy, protested here against the communist dictatorship, and supported the Solidarity movement in Poland. Solidarity's sweeping parliamentary victory in 1989 re-established a free and democratic Poland and re-opened a new chapter in Polish-U.S. diplomatic relations. When Poland joined NATO in 1999 and the European Union in 2004, a new chapter opened in Polish-U.S. diplomatic relations with the promise of exciting but far less dramatic times ahead for the two nations' always friendly relationship.

This historic marker was erected in 2011 to commemorate the centennial of the embassy building and the 90th anniversary of the establishment of Polish-U.S. diplomatic relations.
 
Erected 2011 by Embassy of Poland, District Department of Transportation, Cultural Tourism DC.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Churches & ReligionWar, ColdWar, World II. In addition, it is included in the Adams Morgan Heritage Trail series list.
 
Location. 38° 55.48′ N, 77° 2.196′ W. Marker is in Adams Morgan in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of 16th Street Northwest and Fuller Street Northwest, on the right when traveling south
Prince Kazimierz Lubomirski image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
3. Prince Kazimierz Lubomirski
Prince Kazimierz Lubomirski, independent Poland's first envoy to Washington, speaks to reporters from the embassy's side steps, around 1920.
Close-up of photo on marker
on 16th Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2640 16th Street Northwest, Washington DC 20009, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sonatas (here, next to this marker); Waltzes (here, next to this marker); Impromptus (here, next to this marker); Preludes (here, next to this marker); Nocturns (here, next to this marker); Mazurkas (here, next to this marker); Polonaises (here, next to this marker); Songs (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Adams Morgan.
 
Additional keywords. Holocaust, genocide, embassies, diplomatic relations, Communism
 
Ambassador Jerzy Potocki image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
4. Ambassador Jerzy Potocki
Ambassador Jerzy Potocki (in official diplomatic uniform with white-plumed hat) and visiting Polish diplomats and politicians, around 1938.
Close-up of photo on marker
Marie Skoldowka-Curie & President Warren G. Harding image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
5. Marie Skoldowka-Curie & President Warren G. Harding
Celebrated Polish-French scientist and Nobel laureate Maria Sklodowka-Curie, who discovered radium and polonium, was photographed on the White House steps with President Warren G. Harding, 1921.
Close-up of photo on marker
Ambassdor Jan Ciechanowski image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
6. Ambassdor Jan Ciechanowski
Ambassdor Jan Ciechanowski and family posed on the embassy's front steps in 1925.
Close-up of photo on marker
War! image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
7. War!
The same steps appear in this dramatic 1939 photo announcing the invasion of Poland and beginning of World War II in Europe.
Close-up of photo on marker
Jan Karski image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
8. Jan Karski
In 1943 Jan Karski, an emissary of Poland's government-in-exile, was among the first to deliver eye-witness accounts of the Holocaust to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Few believed the news at the time.
Close-up of photo on marker
Lech Walesa image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
9. Lech Walesa
Lech Walesa, Solidarity leader and Republic of Poland's first democratically elected president after the fall of communism, signs a Solidarity poster at the embassy, 2000.
Close-up of photo on marker
Ambassador Jerzy Kazminski & President Bill Clinton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
10. Ambassador Jerzy Kazminski & President Bill Clinton
Ambassador Jerzy Kazminski stands to President Bill Clinton's right n May 21, 1998, in the White House Rose Garden during the signing of the instruments of ratification for NATO's enlargement. Poland joined NATO in 1999.
Close-up of photo on marker
Prince Lubomirski & Secretary of State Hillary Clinton image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
11. Prince Lubomirski & Secretary of State Hillary Clinton
As the portrait of Prince Lubomirski, Poland's first envoy to Washington, gazed down, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Ambassador Robert Kupiecki meet the press, 2010.
Close-up of photo on marker
Ignacy Jan Paderewski<br>The first prime minister of independent Poland image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
12. Ignacy Jan Paderewski
The first prime minister of independent Poland
2004 statue of Paderewski by Jessie Corsaut at the Polish Embasssy
The Embassy of the Republic of Poland image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
13. The Embassy of the Republic of Poland
The Embassy of The Republic of Poland image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
14. The Embassy of The Republic of Poland
The White Eagle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 19, 2015
15. The White Eagle
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 26, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 23, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 397 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on April 23, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jul. 7, 2020