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Hyde Park in Dutchess County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library

 
 
Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 7, 2015
1. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library Marker
Inscription.  
The building in front of you is the nation’s first presidential library. FDR was deeply involved in every facet of the library’s development. He envisioned the library as a place where the public could examine the evidence of his Presidency and draw their own conclusions about his legacy. He chose a Dutch Colonial style of architecture for the building to represent a sense of endurance. The library opened on June 30, 1941.

FDR inspects the beginnings of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library on September 23, 1939, (above) with his grandaughters Sara and Kate.

FDR’s original sketch for the library (right)

The library houses important documents like the rough draft of the “Day of Infamy” speech (far right). FDR wrote this speech, December 7, 1941, shortly after the bombing of Pearl Habor.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureCharity & Public Work
Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 7, 2015
2. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library Marker
(West Face)
. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #32 Franklin D. Roosevelt series list.
 
Location. 41° 46.091′ N, 73° 56.065′ W. Marker is in Hyde Park, New York, in Dutchess County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Albany Post Road (U.S. 9) and FDR Drive, on the left when traveling north. Located on the grounds of the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4097 Albany Post Road, Hyde Park NY 12538, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The World Mourns (within shouting distance of this marker); Home by the Hudson (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Springwood (about 300 feet away); The heart of Franklin Roosevelt (about 300 feet away); Preserving a President’s View (about 600 feet away); New Guinea Community Site (approx. 1.4 miles away); Firefighter Paul Tegtmeier (approx. 1.4 miles away); Hyde Park RR Station (approx. 1½ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hyde Park.
 
Also see . . .  Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt, National Park Service. (Submitted on May 9, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 7, 2015
3. Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library
(East Face and Entrance)
View East, Towards Rt 9. image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, May 7, 2015
4. View East, Towards Rt 9.
President Roosevelt used the large hayfield between here and Route 9 for farming, and he often expressed the hope that the practice would continue after his death. His wishes, thus far, have been carried out.
It was the President’s belief that the field had been farmed by the Indians long before it was taken over by the Dutch and English colonists. As proof, he pointed to the several large oaks in the field, some of which still exist. Their spreading lower branches he said, could have developed only in open spaces, and the only open spaces in Dutchess County before the colonial period were the Indian Cornfields.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2019. It was originally submitted on May 9, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 588 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 9, 2015, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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Feb. 27, 2021