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Penn Valley in Nevada County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Bridgeport Bridge

"Wood’s Crossing"

 
 
Bridgeport Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 29, 2008
1. Bridgeport Bridge Marker
Inscription.  Bridgeport Bridge, or “Wood’s Crossing”, is the longest single span covered bridge in existence. Used since 1862, built by David I. Wood. This plaque is dedicated to those pioneer Americans who came to California in search of a new life and passed this way to establish their homes in the Northern Mine Country.
 
Erected 1973 by California State Society Daughters of the American Colonists.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Bridges & Viaducts. In addition, it is included in the Covered Bridges, and the Daughters of the American Colonists series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1862.
 
Location. 39° 17.547′ N, 121° 11.699′ W. Marker is in Penn Valley, California, in Nevada County. Marker can be reached from Pleasant Valley Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Penn Valley CA 95946, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bridgeport (Nyes Crossing) Covered Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Bridgeport Historic District (within shouting distance of this marker); a
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different marker also named Bridgeport Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Long Distance Telephone (approx. 2 miles away); Birchville (approx. 3.7 miles away); Jacob Van Blaren (approx. 3.9 miles away); Anthony House and Ranch (approx. 4.1 miles away); Rough and Ready (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Valley.
 
More about this marker. There are three markers for the bridge, two on the south end and one on the north end. See nearby markers for more information.
 
Regarding Bridgeport Bridge. Bridgeport was an important point on the Virginia Turnpike, connecting the agricultural town of Marysville in California’s Central Valley to the gold mines of Virginia City, Nevada. Miners and their supplies were carted eastwards up into the mountains, and the gold was sent back the other direction. The covered bridge had a toll until 1901, after which it was taken over by Nevada County and made free of charge. The California Department of Parks and Recreation acquired the bridge and some of the surrounding
South End of the Bridge image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 29, 2008
2. South End of the Bridge
lands in 1986, incorporating them into South Yuba River State Park. The bridge was restored in 1996, damaged by flooding in 1998, and then subsequently repaired. The bridge is open to non-vehicular traffic only.

There is some question as to whether the Bridgeport covered bridge, at a claimed length of 251 feet, is truly the longest single span covered bridge in existence, as the same claim has been put forth for the Old Blenheim Bridge in New York State. While the Bridgeport covered bridge's total length is longer, it is somewhat shorter when measuring the length it actually clears (i.e., the clear span).
 
Also see . . .
1. Bridgeport Covered Bridge. Wikipedia entry (Submitted on September 10, 2020, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.) 

2. The California Department of Parks and Recreation's webpage for South Yuba River State Park. (Submitted on June 25, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Lamorinda, California.)
 
Bridgeport Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
January 19, 2011
3. Bridgeport Covered Bridge
View of the bridge as seen from the now utilized Pleasant Valley Road Bridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2020. It was originally submitted on June 25, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Lamorinda, California. This page has been viewed 1,503 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 24, 2008, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Lamorinda, California.   3. submitted on January 23, 2011. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 20, 2024