Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Second Battle of Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park

 

— National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
The Second Battle of Fredericksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
1. The Second Battle of Fredericksburg Marker
Inscription.  Five months after the Battle of Fredericksburg the Union army finally captured Marye's Heights. On May 5, 1863, General John Sedgwick's Sixth Corps streamed out of Fredericksburg to attack this ridge. Twice Confederates on the Sunken Road repulsed the assaults, but on the third try Sedgwick's men triumphed. Charging up a ravine 500 yards to your left-front, the victorious Union soldiers swept across this plateau, capturing eight cannon, including two guns of Captain William W. Parker's battery, located here.

From Fredericksburg, Sedgwick headed west to assist the main Union army, fighting at Chancellorsville. He never made it. Four miles west of here, Confederate troops blocked his path at Salem Church. Unable to break through their line, Sedgwick retreated across the Rappahannock River at Scott's Ford.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical month for this entry is May 1862.
 
Location. 38° 17.518′ N, 77° 28.124′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg
Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
2. Battle Map
Click or scan to see
this page online
, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Lafayette Boulevard (State Highway 1). Located on the Marye's Heights walking trail, which starts at the Fredericksburg battlefield visitor center. The Sunken Road is closed to vehicle traffic. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Parker's Battery (a few steps from this marker); Col. Joseph A. Moesch (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Andrew Atkinson Humphreys (about 300 feet away); Battles of Fredericksburg (about 500 feet away); The Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac (about 500 feet away); 127th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry (about 500 feet away); The Sunken Road (about 600 feet away); Fredericksburg National Cemetery (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker is a wartime photo (duplicated on the nearby Field of Battle marker). It is captioned, A photographer standing near this spot took this picture of Fredericksburg in 1864. Note the end of the stone wall, in the center of the picture, and the open plain beyond. On the upper right is a map detailing the Federal attacks during the Second Battle of Fredericksburg.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Second Battle of Fredericksburg virtual tour by markers.
 
Also see . . .  Marye's Heights Virtual Tour. National Park Service page. (Submitted on July 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
The Second Battle of Fredericksburg Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
3. The Second Battle of Fredericksburg Marker
Parker's Battery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
4. Parker's Battery
A lone 12-pounder Field Howitzer represents Parker's Battery at Fredericksburg. Nearby are the Second Battle of Fredericksburg marker and, under the bushes, the Parker's Battery Monument.
Compass Points image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 25, 2008
5. Compass Points
As with many locations on the Fredericksburg-Spotsylvania Battlefields, a compass points out the directions and distances to key points. Of note, this spot is 55 miles north of Richmond and 50 miles south of Washington.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 20, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,423 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 5, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=8848

Paid Advertisement
Dec. 9, 2021