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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Weatherly in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Eckley Miners’ Village

 
 
Eckley Miners’ Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
1. Eckley Miners’ Village Marker
Inscription.  Anthracite coal was the heating and iron-making fuel of choice for much of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Almost all the anthracite came from northeastern Pennsylvania during that time. Eckley Miners’ Village was first opened in 1854 while coal mining was becoming the predominant regional industry. A colliery (breaker), houses, churches, hotel, school and company store were erected over the next 75 years by the mine owners. Both the village and its underlying minerals were controlled by the owners during its 115 years of private concern.

Because the owners made few changes or improvements in the community, the village’s original appearance is easy to see. The village provides today’s visitors with an authentic reflection of life in an anthracite-mining town. That is why Paramount Studios purchased Eckley as a movie set for the Molly Mcguires in 1967-68. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania acquired the village from a local preservation organization in 1971 and opened it as a museum in 1975.

Today, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, working with the Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor and other partners throughout

Visitor Center of Eckley Village image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
2. Visitor Center of Eckley Village
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the northeastern Pennsylvania, preserves and tell the story of the anthracite region and its people.

(Inscription under the photo in the upper right)
Coal from Ekley and other mines in the region first traveled to market by way of the Delaware and Lehigh Canals. By the late 19th century, railroads became the primary method of moving anthracite.

(Inscription under the image in the lower right)
Eckley Miners’ Village today retains about 80 buildings, including mine owner’s houses, miners and laborers’ houses, two churches and other service structures. The Visitor Center exhibition and the village tour explain the growth and decline of the village and the way of life in anthracite “patch towns.”
 
Erected by Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1854.
 
Location. 40° 59.72′ N, 75° 51.377′ W. Marker is near Weatherly, Pennsylvania, in Luzerne County. Marker is on Main Street. The marker is near the entrance to the Visitor Center, Village of Eckley. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 Main Street, Weatherly PA 18255, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Exploring the Corridor (here, next to this marker); Veterans Memorial Tree (a few

Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
3. Inside the Visitor Center
steps from this marker); a different marker also named Eckley Miners' Village (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Eckley Miners’ Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Laborer’s Double Dwelling (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Slate Picker's (about 500 feet away); Eckley Veterans Memorial (approx. ¼ mile away); Land Use (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Weatherly.
 
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
4. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
5. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
6. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
7. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
8. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
9. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
10. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
11. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
12. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
13. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
14. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
15. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
16. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
17. Inside the Visitor Center
Inside the Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, September 29, 2015
18. Inside the Visitor Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 13, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 17, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 174 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. submitted on October 17, 2015, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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