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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Fort Bridger in Uinta County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Charcoal Kilns

 
 
Charcoal Kilns Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 11, 2015
1. Charcoal Kilns Marker
Inscription.  
were built by Moses Byrne, 1869,
to supply the pioneer smelters
in the Utah Valley.

 
Erected 1956 by Historical Landmark Commission of Wyoming.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce.
 
Location. 41° 13.197′ N, 110° 37.171′ W. Marker is near Fort Bridger, Wyoming, in Uinta County. Marker is on Piedmont Road (County Route 173) near County Route 204, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Bridger WY 82933, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Town of Piedmont (within shouting distance of this marker); Muddy Creek Camp and Crossing (approx. 3˝ miles away); Hastings Cutoff - Muddy Creek (approx. 3.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Piedmont Charcoal Kilns - Wyoming State Historical Society. Charcoal production from around 35 kilns in the area reached an estimated 100,000 bushels per month in 1873. The price of charcoal peaked at
Charcoal Kilns Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 11, 2015
2. Charcoal Kilns Marker
27 cents per bushel but later fell to only 7 cents as demand declined.
(Submitted on November 10, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
Piedmont Charcoal Kilns image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, September 11, 2015
3. Piedmont Charcoal Kilns
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on November 10, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 215 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 10, 2015, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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Oct. 21, 2020