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Borger in Hutchinson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Beale Road

 
 
Beale Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, March 15, 2016
1. Beale Road Marker
Inscription.  Edward Fitzgerald “Ned” Beale was a significant figure in 19th century America. In his long career, he was a naval officer, military general, explorer, diplomat, rancher and frontiersman. He fought in the U.S. - Mexico War, emerging as a hero of the Battle of San Pasqual in 1846. He also carried the first gold sample from California to the east, contributing to the gold rush. Under President Franklin Pierce, Secretary of War Jefferson Davis began the Pacific Railroad surveys to determine possible routes for a proposed railroad. Under the following president, James Buchanan, Lieutenant Beale was appointed under Jefferson Davis to survey a southern route to Los Angeles, California.

The Beale Wagon Road has been well documented and marked from Los Angeles through Arizona, New Mexico and the Indian territory of Oklahoma. The upper counties of the Texas panhandle were the connecting link that made this road possible to connect the east with the west and made migration easier and safer with an established road. Two earlier roads passed through Hutchinson County, the Fort Smith-Santa Fe Trail blazed by Josiah Gregg in 1840 and
Beale Road Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Bill Kirchner, March 15, 2016
2. Beale Road Marker
Fort Smith-Santa Fe Trail Marker is on the left, Beale Road Marker is on the right.
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the Marcy Trail established by Captain Randolph B. Marcy in 1849. It was logical for Edward Beale to use the trails that had already been established. During the 20th century these established trails became the famous Route 66 and later developed into Interstate 40. Today, there are still parts of the Beale Wagon Road which are visible, recalling thousands of pioneers who traveled the road in its early days.
 
Erected 2014 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 17949.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Roads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #14 Franklin Pierce, and the Former U.S. Presidents: #15 James Buchanan series lists. A significant historical year for this entry is 1846.
 
Location. 35° 39.264′ N, 101° 24.321′ W. Marker is in Borger, Texas, in Hutchinson County. Marker is on Marcy Trail, on the right when traveling south. Marker is in front of gazebo near library and administration building, Frank Phillips Junior College. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1300 West Roosevelt, Borger TX 79007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Smith-Santa Fe Trail (here, next to this marker); Site of John and Maggie Weatherly Half-Dugout Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Girl Scout Little House
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(approx. one mile away); First Methodist Church of Borger (approx. 1.1 miles away); Cable-tool drilling rig used by the Gulf Oil Corp. (approx. 1˝ miles away); Quanah Parker Trail (approx. 1˝ miles away); Borger 1929 Jail (approx. 1˝ miles away); Grand Hotel and Grand Hardware Building (approx. 1˝ miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Borger.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. It was originally submitted on March 27, 2016, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 326 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 27, 2016, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.

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Oct. 3, 2022