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Emmitsburg in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Daughters of Charity

"O, it was beyond description"

 

— Gettysburg Campaign —

 
Daughters of Charity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
1. Daughters of Charity Marker
Inscription.  Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph's here in 1809 (after 1850, called Daughters of Charity). The sisters played a prominent role during the Civil War as nurses and human service workers, providing compassion in an otherwise violent and painful epoch. They continued Mother Seton's ministry of charity, bringing solace and healing to the wounded of both armies, sometimes at their own peril.

Father James Francis Burlando, C.M., and a group of twelve sisters, taking "baskets of things for the wounded, bandages and other necessaries," were among the first from outside Gettysburg to provide help after the battle. One of the sisters remarked that there was not a woman in sight: "On reaching the Battle grounds, awful! To see the men lying dead on the road some by the side of their horses. O, it was beyond description, hundreds of both armies laying dead almost on the track that the driver had to be careful not to pass over the bodies. O! This picture of human beings slaughtered down by their fellow men in a cruel civil war was perfectly awful." The sisters set up headquarters
Map in the Header of the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
2. Map in the Header of the Marker
Shows nearby Civil War Trails sites.
in McClellan's Hotel (now the Gettysburg Hotel) to provide nursing services.

More than 600 sister nurses from twelve separate religious communities served during the Civil War. Among the sister nurses from four communities with American hospital experience, approximately 270 Daughters of Charity rendered nursing care and spiritual assistance to the wounded of both armies at more than sixty sites in fifteen states.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public WorkWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails series list.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 39° 41.934′ N, 77° 19.644′ W. Marker was in Emmitsburg, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker could be reached from South Seton Avenue (Business U.S. 15), on the right when traveling north. Located in the parking lot for the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 333 South Seton Avenue, Emmitsburg MD 21727, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. St. Joseph's Valley Camp (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Daughters of Charity (a few steps from this marker); Gen. John F. Reynolds
Civil War Trails Marker Cluster image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 22, 2008
3. Civil War Trails Marker Cluster
In the parking lot for the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. From left to right Daughters of Charity, St. Joseph's Valley Camp, and General John F. Reynolds.
(a few steps from this marker); The First Statue of Mother Seton Erected in the United States (within shouting distance of this marker); The Stone House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Bells of St. Joseph's Valley (about 700 feet away); Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul of New York (about 700 feet away); Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton (1774-1821) (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Emmitsburg.
 
More about this marker. On the left side of the marker is a portrait of Seton who would become the first United States born Catholic saint. In the center is a portrait of Father James Francis Burlando, C.M. (1814-73). In the upper right is a photo of St. Joseph's Academy and Central House of the Daughters of Charity (1867). On the lower right is a drawing from Harpers Weekly depicting one of the sisters providing comfort and spiritual assistance to a wounded soldier.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This marker has been replaced by the linked marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sisters of Charity in the Civil War. The Sisters' effort in the war was for the love of God and love of humanity. (Submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph. A brief history of the sisterhood. (Submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Daughters of Charity Emmitsburg Province. Today, the Daughters of Charity are an international community of over 21,000 women ministering on all continents throughout 94 countries in the world. Wherever there
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is human suffering, you will find Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul: happy, dedicated, caring, and creative. (Submitted on July 24, 2008.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,922 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 23, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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Feb. 28, 2021