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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Scotia in Schenectady County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Maalwyck

 
 
Maalwyck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2016
1. Maalwyck Marker
Inscription.  
This House Built Ca. 1712
By Karel Hansel Toll, Who
Settled Here 1685. Broom
Farm Became an Outpost Of
Mohawk Valley Turnpike.

 
Erected by State Education Department.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 42° 49.807′ N, 73° 58.574′ W. Marker is in Scotia, New York, in Schenectady County. Marker is on Mohawk Ave. (New York State Route 5), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 511 Mohawk Ave, Schenectady NY 12302, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robert Allen Deitcher (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Movable Dam at Lock 8 (approx. ¾ mile away); Enlarged Lock 23 (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Camp (approx. 0.8 miles away); Enlarged Erie Canal Lock 23 (approx. 0.8 miles away); In Commemoration (approx. 0.9 miles away); Abraham Glen House 1730 (approx. 0.9 miles away); Mohawk Turnpike (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scotia.
 
Also see . . .
Maalwyck Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2016
2. Maalwyck Marker
 "Schenectady Brooms Keep the Nation’s Homes Clean:” Brooms and Broomcorn in Schenectady County. (Submitted on July 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords. Broomcorn Broom Corn
 
Maalwyck House image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, May 14, 2016
3. Maalwyck House
Maalwyck Farm Sale image. Click for full size.
Schenectady County Historical Society
4. Maalwyck Farm Sale
Notice of auction of Maalwyck Farm in Scotia, one of the many local farms where broomcorn was grown. Image courtesy of the Grems-Doolittle Library Photograph Collection, Schenectady County Historical Society.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 4, 2016. It was originally submitted on July 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 412 times since then and 110 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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May. 31, 2020