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Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Georgetown Refuge

Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail-War of 1812

 

— National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —

 
Georgetown Refuge Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
1. Georgetown Refuge Marker
Inscription.  In 1814 this was the home of the Charles Carroll family, fiends of President James Madison and his wife, Dolley. Carroll came to the President’s House on August 24, as Madison was returning from the defeat at Battle of Bladensburg. Soon word arrived that Dolley should save what she could and flee the city. Piling into carriages, Dolley, family, and servants set off for the relative safety of Georgetown, stopping to collect the family of U.S. Navy Secretary William Jones before arriving here.

“Our kind friend, Mr. Carroll, has come to hasten my departure, and is in a very bad humor with me because I insist on waiting until the large picture of Gen. George Washington is secured.”
Dolley Madison to her sister, August 24, 1814.

Escape to Virginia
Soon President Madison sent a second message to his wife instructing her and Navy Secretary Jones to meet him at Wiley’s Tavern, Virginia. Dolley’s entourage fled west to safety, crossing the Little Falls of the Potomac River on Chain Bridge as the British arrived from the east.

In the summer of 1814 the United States had been at war with Great Britain

Georgetown Refuge Marker and the gardens image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
2. Georgetown Refuge Marker and the gardens
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for two years. Battlefronts had erupted from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. On August 24, following their victory over the Americans at the Battle of Bladensburg, Maryland, British troops marched on Washington with devastating results.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsWar of 1812. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #04 James Madison, and the Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail series lists.
 
Location. 38° 54.643′ N, 77° 3.302′ W. Marker is in Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of Q Street Northwest and 27th Street Northwest, on the right when traveling west on Q Street Northwest. The marker is located on the south east corner of the property as you enter into the gardens toward the Mansion. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2715 Q Street Northwest, Washington DC 20007, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. "The bramble and trees…had made them invisible" (within shouting distance of this marker); “… on a high, dry, & handsome situation” (within shouting distance of this marker); Mt. Zion Cemetery / Female Union Band Society Cemetery
Dumbarton House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
3. Dumbarton House
(within shouting distance of this marker); Tulip Poplar (within shouting distance of this marker); In Grateful Commemoration of the Signing of the Constitution (within shouting distance of this marker); Dumbarton House (within shouting distance of this marker); "…a headquarters to call our own" (within shouting distance of this marker); Eastern Redbud (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Welcome to Dumbarton House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
4. Welcome to Dumbarton House
Text on the Welcome sign-Dumbarton House is a Federal period home built in 1799 by Samuel Jackson. Joseph Nourse, the first Registrar of the Treasury who served under six presidents, resided here from 1804 to 1813. Through the interpretation of its historic site and collections, Dumbarton House promotes the understanding of historic preservation and of the early history of our nation. In 1928 the house was purchased by The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America (NSCDA) to serve as a museum and as the NSCDA headquarters.
Entrance sign to Dumbarton House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
5. Entrance sign to Dumbarton House
Street view of the Dumbarton House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Don Morfe, July 16, 2016
6. Street view of the Dumbarton House
Both of the bronze plaques on the entrance wall have been published on HMDB.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 12, 2019. It was originally submitted on July 17, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 322 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 17, 2016, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Sep. 29, 2022