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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Lewisburg in Preble County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Welcome to the National Road

The Historic National Road in Ohio

 

— West Gate —

 
Welcome to the National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 5, 2016
1. Welcome to the National Road Marker
Inscription.  The National Road crosses six states from Baltimore, Maryland to East st. Louis, Illinois. the road fulfilled the dreams of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to build an all-weather route acros the Allegheny Mountains to connect the Eastern Seaboard with the Midwest.The road was conceived by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under Thomas Jefferson, and was authorized by Congress in 1806. The road was the nation’s first federally funded interstate highway and opened the West for the movement of people and goods.

Construction began in 1811 in Cumberland, Maryland, extending an earlier route from Baltimore. By 1818, the road reached the Ohio River; by 1833, it was completed to Columbus, Ohio; in 1850, it extended to Vandalia, Illinois.

The National Road is an engineering marvel. graceful stone arch bridges cross streams and rivers. Inns and taverns were built to meet the need of travelers. Many of the bridges and buildings that characterized the early days of the road can still be found in towns along the road today.

Much of the old National road is still part of U.S. Route 40. Several sections of the original road are

Welcome to the National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 5, 2016
2. Welcome to the National Road Marker
Full view of marker
no longer used as highways but can still be explored. The longest segment of the National Road is found in Ohio, covering 227 miles from Bridgeport on the east to the Indiana state line on the west.
 
Erected 2010 by The Rodeo Shop and generous members of the Ohio National Road Association.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the The Historic National Road series list.
 
Location. 39° 50.813′ N, 84° 38.678′ W. Marker is near Lewisburg, Ohio, in Preble County. Marker is on National Road (U.S. 40), on the right when traveling west. Marker is located in a pull-off in front of the Rodeo Shop. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 811 US 40, Lewisburg OH 45338, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Euphemia (approx. 5.7 miles away); Camp Maple Swamp (approx. 6 miles away); a different marker also named Welcome to the National Road (approx. 6.3 miles away); Van Ausdal-Donohoe House (approx. 7.1 miles away); Preble County Courthouse (approx. 7.1 miles away); William Bruce
Welcome to the National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 5, 2016
3. Welcome to the National Road Marker
Marker can be seen at a distance
(approx. 7.1 miles away); Monument at Mound Hill Cemetery (approx. 7.2 miles away); Mound Hill Cemetery Civil War Memorial (approx. 7.3 miles away).
 
Additional keywords. Old National Road
 
Welcome to the National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 5, 2016
4. Welcome to the National Road Marker
Magazine cover portrayed on the marker
Welcome to the National Road Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, July 5, 2016
5. Welcome to the National Road Marker
National Road mile-marker, a well known symbol of the National Road
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 8, 2016. It was originally submitted on August 5, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 236 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 5, 2016, by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Jun. 5, 2020