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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Clarksville in Red River County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Five Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence from Red River County

 
 
Five Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence from Red River County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
1. Five Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence from Red River County Marker
Inscription.  On March 2, 1836, members of the Convention of 1836 signed the Texas Declaration of Independence at Washington-on-the-Brazos, declaring Texas independent from Mexico. Of the 59 signers, five were from Red River County, more than from any of the other old Spanish-Mexican districts or the new Republic of Texas counties. The five signers were Richard Ellis, Robert Hamilton, Albert Hamilton Latimer, Samuel Price Carson and Collin McKinney.

Richard Ellis (1781-1846) was born in Virginia and moved to Pecan Point on the Red River by 1834, establishing a plantation. He was President of the Convention of 1836 and served two terms as Senator (1836-40) of the Republic of Texas. Robert Hamilton (1783-1843) immigrated from Scotland to North Carolina in 1807. He fought in the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812 and came to Texas in 1834, settling on Pecan Bayou near Lagrange (later Madras). In 1836, he became Chief Justice of Red River County. Albert Hamilton Latimer (c. 1800-1877) settled near Pecan Point in 1833 and served two terms (1840-42) as Representative for Red River County. A Unionist, Latimer was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1866, and was appointed State Comptroller (1857) and Associate Justice of the Texas Supreme Court (1869). Samuel Price Carson (1798-1838) served as a state and U.S. Representative for
View of Marker on far left, looking towards Locust Street. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
2. View of Marker on far left, looking towards Locust Street.
North Carolina before coming to Texas. He was elected Secretary of State for the Texas ad interim government. Collin McKinney (1766-1861) was born in New Jersey. He served three terms (1836-38, 1839-40) as a Texas State Representative. Both Collin County and the City of McKinney are named for him. Today, these Red River County pioneers continue to be remembered as leading figures in Texas Independence.

Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 2009 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15884.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Settlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence.
 
Location. 33° 36.684′ N, 95° 3.009′ W. Marker is in Clarksville, Texas, in Red River County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Locust Street and Broadway Street. Located in the town square, previous site of the courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 107 Locust Street, Clarksville TX 75426, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Members of Confederate Congresses (here, next to this marker); The Rev. William Stevenson (a few steps from this marker); Stagecoach Stand, C. S. A. (a few steps from this marker); Home of Col. Charles DeMorse (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Northern Standard (about 600 feet away); Red River County War Memorial
View of town square and this marker near Texas flag. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
3. View of town square and this marker near Texas flag.
(about 700 feet away); Red River Courthouse (about 800 feet away); Red River County Jail (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clarksville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 22, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 15, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 310 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 15, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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Jun. 2, 2020