Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Anacostia in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Booth's Escape

An East-of-the-River View

 

—Anacostia Heritage Trail —

 
Booth's Escape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
1. Booth's Escape Marker
Inscription. Late On The Night Of April 14, 1865, a guard at the other end of the Navy Yard Bridge allowed a young man on horseback to cross, despite a wartime curfew. Unbeknownst to the guard, the rider, John Wilkes Booth, had just shot President Abraham Lincoln at Ford's Theatre. Booth was fleeing to the home of Dr. Samuel Mudd in Prince George's County, Maryland, by way of Good Hope Road.

As details of the assassination arrived at the Anacostia police substation days later, so did a rumor that Booth might be hiding out in the area. Officers commenced a hunt for the fugitive, but he was long gone.

The bridge Booth traveled, the first of many at this site, was built in 1820 to allow residents to reach jobs at the Navy Yard. Before then people used the Eastern Branch Bridge at Pennsylvania Avenue. That structure, which dated to 1797, was blown up in August 1814 as the British marched toward Washington bent on its destruction during the War of 1812. Unfortunately the British succeeded in reaching the capital via Bladensburg Road instead. General William H. Winder, commander of the defenses of Washington and Baltimore, ordered the destruction of the Navy Yard as well, to keep it out of British hands.

This intersection was Anacostia's first commercial center. From here businesses spread east on Good Hope Road
Booth's Escape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
2. Booth's Escape Marker
and south along Nichols Avenue. Among the earliest establishments were Robert Martin's general store and post office, his Farmers' and Drovers' Hotel, David Haines's blacksmith and wheelwright shop, Duvall's Tavern, and George Pyle's grocery. Out Good Hope Road, greenhouses and a brick factory provided local jobs.
 
Erected by Anacostia Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 14.)
 
Location. 38° 52.058′ N, 76° 59.304′ W. Marker is in Anacostia, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast and Good Hope Road Southeast, on the right when traveling north on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1800 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue Southeast, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Big Chair (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Big Chair (approx. 0.2 miles away); The World’s Largest Chair (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mother Churches and Their Daughters (approx. 0.2 miles away); Uniontown, DC's First Suburb (approx. 0.2 miles away); Education Matters
Navy Yard Bridge<br>Over the Eastern Branch of the Potomac image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Navy Yard Bridge
Over the Eastern Branch of the Potomac
The Navy Yard Bridge, 1862, A Bridge has crossed over the Anacostia River here since 1820 taking men and women to jobs at the Navy Yard/Naval Gun Factory.
(approx. ¼ mile away); The Sage of Anacostia (approx. 0.3 miles away); Crossing Lines (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Anacostia.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
$100,000 Reward image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. $100,000 Reward
This poster advertised the reward for the capture of John wilkes Booth and conspirators Mary Surratt and David Herold (misspelled Harold.)
W.L Koontz Co. Feed Store image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
5. W.L Koontz Co. Feed Store
In Anacostia's early days, W.L. Koontz's feed store occupied the corner of Nichols and Good Hope.
Close-up of photo on marker
Monthly Statement image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
6. Monthly Statement
In 1881 Frederick Douglass shopped at Martin's at the corner of Harrison (now Good Hope) and Monroe (Martin Luther King Jr, Ave.)
Close-up of photo on marker
Joe Puglisi image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
7. Joe Puglisi
Joe Puglisi in his shoe repair shop at 1214 Good Hope Road during the 1950s.
Close-up of photo on marker
Max Simon's Shoe Shop image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
8. Max Simon's Shoe Shop
Max Simon's shoe shop, pictured here in the 1940s, occupied 1911 Nichols Ave.
1900 Block of Nichols Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
9. 1900 Block of Nichols Avenue
A 1949 view of the 1900 block of Martin Luther King Jr. (then Nichols) Ave. includes a Hechinger hardware and a clothing store catering to sailors.
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 2, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 418 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 2, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8, 9. submitted on January 7, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement