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Spanish Fort in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate Redoubt No. 5 / Ector's Brigade

 
 
Confederate Redoubt No. 5 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 14, 2017
1. Confederate Redoubt No. 5 Marker
Inscription.
Side 1
Also called the Sandbag Battery, Redoubt No. 5 was originally commanded by Lt. Andrew Hargrove of Lumsden's Tuscaloosa Battery, Company F, 2nd Alabama Light Artillery Battalion. During the early stages of the battle, Lumsden's Battery was relocated 200 yards west of this location in order to strengthen the far left of the Confederate line. Afterwards, the same artillerists that manned Redoubt No. 4 also manned the Sandbag Battery. The redoubt was armed with four 3-inch ordinance rifles. Lumsden's new location was armed with three mortars and four 6-pounder cannons. The men jokingly referred to these guns as ‘popguns.” Capt. Thomas Perry's Marion (Florida) Light Artillery relieved Lumsden's Battery on April 6, 1865.

Side 2
Ector's Infantry Brigade occupied the earthworks on the Confederate left flank during the Battle of Spanish Fort. Col. David Coleman was temporarily in command of the brigade. The 29th and 39th NC Infantry Regiments were on the brigade’s right. On the left were the Texas Regiments if the 9th TX Infantry and the 10th, 14th, and 32nd TX (dismounted) Cavalry.were on the brigade's right. At dusk on April 8, 1865, Lt. Col. William Bell's 8th Iowa breached the far left of the Confederate line. After seeing the initial success. the Union's 3rd Brigade commander, Col.
Ector's Brigade Marker (Side 2) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 14, 2017
2. Ector's Brigade Marker (Side 2)
James Geddes, ordered Lt. Col. Andrew Rogers' 81st Illinois to support the assault. The North Carolina troops along with 100 Provost Guards made a desperate counterattack that stabilized the Confederate line. Provost Marshall Capt. Alfred Clarke was mortally wounded while leading this counterattack. General Gibson quickly realized that his entire garrison was in jeopardy of being cut off from their only escape route to the Blakeley River, so he decided to evacuate the earthworks during the night.
 
Erected by Sons of Confederate Veterans - Admiral Raphael Semmes Camp 11.
 
Location. 30° 41.056′ N, 87° 54.79′ W. Marker is in Spanish Fort, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker is on Artillery Range Street north of Yankee Trove. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 890 Artillery Range Street, Spanish Fort AL 36527, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The 8th Iowa Infantry (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Redoubt No. 4 / Holtzclaw's Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Final Assault (approx. ¼ mile away); The Union First Parallel / Union Siege Battery No. 16 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Red Fort
The view northerly on Artillery Range Street image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 14, 2017
3. The view northerly on Artillery Range Street
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Union Siege Battery No. 21 / 3rd Brigade of Carr's Division (approx. 0.4 miles away); Confederate Redoubt No. 3 / Gibson’s Brigade (approx. half a mile away); Confederate Main Line of Resistance (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Spanish Fort.
 
More about this marker. Over the last few years these markers have been repainted and repaired.

This marker is located very close to a hedge row.
 
Also see . . .  Civil War wiki on the Battle of Spanish Fort. (Submitted on January 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Looking southerly towards the intersection of Yankee Trove. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 14, 2017
4. Looking southerly towards the intersection of Yankee Trove.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 199 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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