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Farragut in Knox County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of Campbell Station

History of the Farragut Area

 
 
The Battle of Campbell Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 26, 2016
1. The Battle of Campbell Station Marker
Inscription. On Nov. 4, 1863, Lt. Gen. James Longstreet — with two divisions, about 5,000 cavalry and approximately 12,000 troops — was detached from the Confederate Army of Tennessee near Chattanooga to attack Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside's Union Department of the Ohio troops at Knoxville. Knoxville was a vital stronghold for both armies as it was where supplies for the South were brought in from Virginia by rail.

Although opposing forces first confronted each other briefly at Loudon, it was just the start of the race to Knoxville. With approximately 5,000 troops, General Burnside's Union forces, although greatly outnumbered by Longstreet's troops, were ordered to draw the Confederate army to Campbell Station and delay their advance to Knoxville. This strategic site was chosen by Burnside as a defensive location due to its high ground.

On a cold and miserable Nov. 16, the battle began. Under General Burnside, the Union troops arrived first with barely enough time to set up defenses on the high ground near the present day intersection of Concord Road and Kingston Pike. After six hours of heavy fighting, the Confederates failed to break through the Union line, and night fell. Total casualties were about 348 Confederate and 338 Union troops.

Delaying the Confederate forces enabled the Union troops already
The Battle of Campbell Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, December 26, 2016
2. The Battle of Campbell Station Marker
in Knoxville to prepare fortifications. Through the night, Burnside's division continued to race Longstreet towards Knoxville, taking them away from General Braxton Bragg to the south. Successful in their mission to delay the Confederate's offensive, Union troops continued to Knoxville to join forces in the successful defense of the city. The Battle of Campbell Station was described by one officer as being, from beginning to end, the "prettiest little fight" ever fought.
 
Erected by Farragut Museum.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the History of the Farragut Area marker series.
 
Location. 35° 53.267′ N, 84° 10.033′ W. Marker is in Farragut, Tennessee, in Knox County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of North Campbell Station Road and Herron Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the walking trail in Campbell Station Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 405 N Campbell Station Rd, Knoxville TN 37934, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Historic Village of Concord (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Historic Village of Concord (within shouting distance of this marker); Farragut Schools: Early Years
The Battle of Campbell Station image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
3. The Battle of Campbell Station
(within shouting distance of this marker); Admiral David Glasgow Farragut (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Farragut Schools: Recent Years (about 300 feet away); Town of Farragut & Farragut Folklife Museum (about 300 feet away); Pleasant Forest Church & Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Native American Settlement (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Farragut.
 
Also see . . .  Campbell’s Station. (Submitted on March 12, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Campbell Station Park image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
4. Campbell Station Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 16, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 201 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 16, 2017, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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