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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Irish Railroad Workers Shrine

 
 
Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Left Panel image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
1. Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Left Panel
Inscription.
Shrine Left Panel
The successive failures of the potato crops in the 1840ís, the inability or willingness of the British Parliament to respond to the ensuing famine, forced evictions of the peasants from their homeland by British landlords, epidemics and resulting emigration, resulted in Ireland losing nearly one half of itsí population within just a matter of years. The right panel of the mural portrays life in Ireland during the period of the Great Hunger showing row houses in Galway, an eviction scene and a contemporary newspaper depiction of some of the millions who immigrated to America from the late 1840ís through the end of the century.

The middle panel portrays the often terrifying voyage across the Atlantic, in which thousands died from shipwreck and fevers. Those fortunate enough to escape often died in the notorious “coffin ships” that transported thousands to Canada, the U.S. and elsewhere. It is estimated that over 5,000 transatlantic crossing of ships loaded with Irish refugees were made between 1845-1851, approximately 2,000,000 persons per year. The use of unseaworthy vessels or passengers and crew succumbing to fevers en route resulted in the deaths of thousands. The scene here in a detail from British artist J.M.W. Turnerís painting “Slaveship” (1840). It selected for Turnerís particular

Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Center Panel image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
2. Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Center Panel
ability to portray the violence of the sea, and the fact that some of the earliest “coffin ships” were actually retired British slavers employed to transport evicted Irish peasants.

Having survived all of this, the newly arrived immigrants, many of who did not speak English, found that they were not entirely welcome. While many were not poor or unskilled, many others were agricultural workers who then found themselves competing for menial labor in Americaís large cities. Both for comfort and protection, the Irish settled enclaves that became “Irish neighborhoods”. The story of the Irish workers, who settled around the B&O Railroad yards on streets like Lemmon St. in St. Peterís Parish, is one such story. The left panel shows us more than one generation of the men of this neighborhood at work at the B&O and suggests the fact that the descendants of the immigrants carried on this tradition up into the Mid-20th Century.

Shrine Right Panel
Emigrants leaving Queenstown for New York. This mural and memorial wall, the exhibits inside 918-920 Lemmon St., and the very buildings themselves are meant to honor those who came before us. Whether we are descended from railroad families or have a different story to tell, The Irish Shrine is a place for all Irish-Americans to connect with the powerful story that resulted in our lives here today.
 
Location.

Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Right Panel image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
3. Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-Right Panel
39° 17.191′ N, 76° 37.961′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is on Lemmon Street. Touch for map. The shrine is located in the back yard of The Irish Railroad Workers Museum and Shrine. Marker is at or near this postal address: 918-920 Lemmon Street, Baltimore MD 21223, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Baltimore & Ohio Railroad (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Chessie's Famous "Big Mike" (about 500 feet away); The National Road (about 500 feet away); Railroads Eclipse a National Road (about 500 feet away); The Car That Carried Ike on His Last Trip (about 700 feet away); Walters Public Bath House No. 2 (approx. ľ mile away); Brig. General Lewis A. Armistead (approx. 0.3 miles away); National Independence in the Revolution and War of 1812 (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Categories. Notable Events
 
Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-All three panels image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
4. Irish Railroad Workers Shrine Marker-All three panels
Irish Railroad Workers Museum and Shrine-front of the buildings image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
5. Irish Railroad Workers Museum and Shrine-front of the buildings
Irish Railroad Workers Museum-Inside the house image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 12, 2017
6. Irish Railroad Workers Museum-Inside the house
The house is 10 feet wide and 24 feet long, three stories high.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 125 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 13, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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