Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Roger B. Taney Monument

Reconciling History

 

—Baltimore's Confederate Monuments —

 
Roger B. Taney Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 25, 2017
1. Roger B. Taney Monument Marker
Inscription. In 1836, Roger Brooke Taney became Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and served in this position until his death in 1864. In 1857, he wrote the Dred Scott decision, which stated that African American—enslaved and free--- were property and could never be citizens of the United States.

In 1887, this monument sculpted by William Henry Rinehart was given to the City of Baltimore by businessman, art patron, and Confederate sympathizer William Walters. This monument is an exact replica of the 1872 Taney monument also commissioned by Walters which sits on the grounds of the State House in Annapolis. At the dedication in Annapolis, Severn Teakle Wallis stated that the figure was a “protest in living bronze” against the U.S. Congress, which in 1865 had withheld funds to create a bust of Taney. Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts had justified the Congressional withholding of funds for the monument stating that the Dred Scott decision was a “terrible decision where a most unrighteous judgment was sustained by a falsification of history.” This monument helped to promote white supremacy in Baltimore.

In 2015, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake appointed a Special Commission to Review Baltimore’s Public Confederate Monuments to provide recommendations based on informed decisions and citizen input on

Roger B. Taney Monument image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, February 25, 2017
2. Roger B. Taney Monument
Inscription on the plaque at the base of the monument-Roger B. Taney of Maryland Chief Justice
how to address Baltimore’s Confederate-related monuments. While the Taney Monument is not explicitly a Confederate monument, the Dred Scott decision advanced slavery in America and was closely tied to the Confederate cause.

This plaque serves to inform the public on the history of Baltimore’s Confederate monuments. For more information, please review the Special Commission to Review Baltimore’s Public Confederate Monuments Report to Mayor Rawlings-Blake located at www.chap.baltimorecity.gov.

Sign content developed by the Baltimore City Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation Graphic design services provided by the Baltimore National Heritage Area.
 
Location. Marker has been reported permanently removed. It was located near 39° 17.872′ N, 76° 36.941′ W. Marker was in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker was on Charles Street. Touch for map. The marker is located on the north garden of Mount Vernon Place. Marker was in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Romance of a Romantic (a few steps from this marker); Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Celebrating Culture

Roger B. Taney Monument Marker-Base only image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 19, 2017
3. Roger B. Taney Monument Marker-Base only
The statue was removed on August 16, 2017 by the City of Baltimore because if was deemed offensive to the public.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Mistake (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Honor (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Contributing to Society (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Also see . . .
1. Roger B. Taney Statue. Smithsonian Institution Research Information System. (Submitted on March 1, 2017.) 

2. Baltimore City commission recommends removal of two Confederate monuments. by Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun, Jan 14, 2016. (Submitted on March 11, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. Roger Brooke Taney Monument. Special Commission to Review Baltimore's Public Confederate Monuments. (Submitted on March 11, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

4. Roger B. Taney Monument. in Cindy Kelly's Outdoor Sculpture in Baltimore: A Historical Guide to Public Art in the Monumental City, 2011, pg. 65-66. (Submitted on March 11, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

5. Washington Post Baltimore hauls away four Confederate monuments after overnight removal. (Submitted on August 16, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. African AmericansPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Roger B. Taney image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
4. Roger B. Taney
of Maryland
Chief Justice
Roger B. Taney image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
5. Roger B. Taney
1871/1887 by William Henry Rinehart.
The Constitution image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
6. The Constitution
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 288 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 27, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   3. submitted on August 20, 2017, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   4, 5, 6. submitted on March 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement