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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall

 
 
Paddle Tug <i>Eppleton Hall</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
1. Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall Marker
Captions: (main photo) Eppleton Hall during her builder's trials, 1914.; (diagram on bottom right) "Grasshopper" side lever engines similar to those of the Eppleton Hall. The engines shown here share a common shaft while Eppleton Hall's are independent.
Inscription. "The Eppleton Hall is the handiest type of tug that was ever built." - Captain John Gibson, Sunderland, England.

Eppleton Hall is typical of the tugs used in the coal ports of Northern England to tow barges and shipping. Similar paddle tugs were used in San Francisco during the 1850s and 1860s.
The boat is powered by to single cylinder "grasshopper" type steam engines. The design dates from the mid-19th century. Independent engine controls gave these tugs great maneuverability.
Eppleton Hall worked in England on the River Wear until she was retired in 1968. After extensive restoration she was steamed to San Francisco under her own power in 1970.

BASIC FACTS:
Built: 1914, South Shields, England
Builder: William Hepple and Company
Length Overall - 100 feet
Beam Over Guards - 33 feet
Draft - 7 feet, 4 inches
Gross Tonnage - 166

 
Erected by U.S. Department of the Interior. National Park Service, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park.
 
Location. 37° 48.568′ N, 122° 25.312′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker can be reached from Hyde Street near Jefferson Street
Paddle Tug <i>Eppleton Hall</i> and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
2. Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall and Marker
, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2950 Hyde Street, San Francisco CA 94109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ship Balclutha (a few steps from this marker); The Cathead... (within shouting distance of this marker); Schooner C.A. Thayer (within shouting distance of this marker); The Forecastle... (within shouting distance of this marker); Petaluma's Sternwheel (within shouting distance of this marker); Steam Tug Hercules (within shouting distance of this marker); Towing in the Open Ocean (within shouting distance of this marker); Workin' on the Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The paddle tug Eppleton Hall, part of the San Francisco Maritime Nation Historical Park, is located on the Hyde Street Pier at the bottom of Hyde Street.
 
Also see . . .  Eppleton Hall (1914) - Wikipedia. Sold to shipbreakers Clayton and Davie Ltd for scrap in 1967, she was left sitting on a mud bank in Dunston. As part of the scrapping process her wooden afterdeck and interior were destroyed by fire prior to being broken up.
Paddle Tug <i>Eppleton Hall</i> image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
3. Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall
The tug remained there for two years, deck frames warped, wood burned or rotted, hull part flooded and engines rusty but intact.
(Submitted on March 7, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Paddle Tug <i>Eppleton Hall</i> image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 4, 2017
4. Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall
Paddle Tug <i>Eppleton Hall</i> entering San Francisco Bay image. Click for full size.
By SF Gate, 1970
5. Paddle Tug Eppleton Hall entering San Francisco Bay
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 7, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 7, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 89 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 7, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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