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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rockville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church

Southwest corner of North Washington Street and Beall Avenue

 

—Site #15 —

 
Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
1. Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church Marker
Inscription. In 1867, several of Rockville's African American families left Jerusalem Methodist Episcopal Church to start the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Zion Church under the leadership of Reverend Charles Pipkins.

In 1890, Pipkins and his congregation cut timbers and erected. a frame church on Middle Lane. The church had an auxiliary building identified on an 1892 map as the Ethiopian Hall, an early reference to Ethiopianism, a movement that later influenced the development of Rastafarianism.

In 1904, the congregation moved to the brick church seen in this photograph, located on North Washington Street and today's Beall Avenue. The church was named Clinton A.M.E. Zion in honor of Reverend George Wylie Clinton (1859-1921), a prominent member and editor of the church's periodical, Star of Zion. The congregation sold the brick church in 1955 to make way for a shopping center, dedicating their present church on Elizabeth Avenue in Lincoln Park in the fall of 1956.
 
Erected by Rockville African American Walking Tour. (Marker Number 15.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland, Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour marker series.
 
Location. 39° 5.202′ N, 77° 
Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
2. Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church
Close-up of photo on marker
9.171′ W. Marker is in Rockville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of North Washington Street and Beall Avenue when traveling north on North Washington Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rockville MD 20850, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mr. T’s (within shouting distance of this marker); Rockville’s First Colored Schools (within shouting distance of this marker); Rockville Town Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Galilean Temple (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Snowden Funeral Home (about 300 feet away); Hebron House and Print Shop (about 400 feet away); Rockville Methodist Episcopal Church - Jerusalem/Mount Pleasant (about 400 feet away); Jerusalem - Mount Pleasant Church and Parsonage (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rockville.
 
Also see . . .  Rockville's African American Heritage Walking Tour. (Submitted on March 12, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & Religion
 
Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
3. Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church Marker
Of By For image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
4. Of By For
William Cochran's 2010 mural, Cornerstone
Cornerstone is a civil rights mural that anchors the corner of the new Rockville Town Square near Washington DC. This site-specific artwork faces North Washington Street, a centuries-old roadway with Native American, Colonial, Revolutionary, and Civil War history. Three banners with historical text include the 'X' marks of twenty illiterate freedmen on a pledge to pay for Rockville's first black school in 1867. The artwork highlights a cluster of African American heritage sites from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, now largely obscured by development.” — William Cochran
Liberty as a Young Girl image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
5. Liberty as a Young Girl
“In Cornerstone, Liberty is depicted as a very young child of multiple ancestral backgrounds.” — William Cochran.

The X's behind Liberty represent the marks of the 20 recently freed African Americans on a petition to the Freedmen's Bureau promising to support an African American school in Rockville in 1867. The three written-out signatures are: Hezekiah H. Williams, Hanson Martin and William Kelly.
William Cochran, 2010 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, March 11, 2017
6. William Cochran, 2010
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 12, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 125 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 12, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on March 14, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on March 16, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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