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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Delaware City in New Castle County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

W. Emerson Wilson

1908 - 1982

 
 
W. Emerson Wilson Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
1. W. Emerson Wilson Plaque
Inscription.
In Memory of
W. Emerson Wilson
1908 - 1982

Through his leadership Pea Patch Island was returned to the State of Delaware by the Federal Government in 1948. He was the founder and first president of the Fort Delaware Society, January 1950 and was elected chairman of the board in 1956.
 
Erected 1982 by Fort Delaware Society.
 
Location. 39° 35.37′ N, 75° 34.062′ W. Marker is near Delaware City, Delaware, in New Castle County. Touch for map. Marker is on Pea Patch Island inside Fort Delaware. The island can only be reached by ferry from Delaware City or Fort Mott, NJ. Marker is in this post office area: Delaware City DE 19706, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sally Port (a few steps from this marker); Batteries Hentig and Dodd (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pea Patch Island (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pea Patch Island Heronry (approx. 1.2 miles away in New Jersey); Ammunition Hoist (approx. 1.3 miles away in New Jersey); Battery Krayenbuhl (approx.
Marker in Fort Delaware image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
2. Marker in Fort Delaware
The W. Emerson Wilson marker is located next to the sallyport in Fort Delaware.
1.3 miles away in New Jersey); Battery Commanderís Station (approx. 1.3 miles away in New Jersey); Battery Edwards (approx. 1.3 miles away in New Jersey). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Delaware City.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Delaware State Park. (Submitted on August 13, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Inside of Fort Delaware image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
3. Inside of Fort Delaware
The W. Emerson Wilson Marker can be seen to the right of the entrance to Fort Delaware (above the cannon).
Fort Delaware State Park Sign image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
4. Fort Delaware State Park Sign
Sign is at the ferry dock on Pea Patch Island.
Fort Delaware image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
5. Fort Delaware
Fort was built in 1812 to protect Philadelphia from the British. It is a star shaped fort designed to deflect direct hits by cannon shots. Fort Delaware was the largest prisoner of war camp during the Civil War with over 9500 Confederate prisoners housed on the grounds of Pea Patch Island. Costumed reenactors give demonstrations of fort life in 1864.
Interior of Fort Delaware image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
6. Interior of Fort Delaware
Restored Mess Hall image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
7. Restored Mess Hall
32 Pounder Demostration inside fort. image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
8. 32 Pounder Demostration inside fort.
Fort Delaware surrounded by moat. image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
9. Fort Delaware surrounded by moat.
Prisoner Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
10. Prisoner Barracks
Reconstructed example of one of many barracks that housed Confederate prisoners.
Interior of prison barracks image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 10, 2008
11. Interior of prison barracks
Reenactor explains life of a Confederate prisoner.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,484 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 13, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   2. submitted on August 12, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on October 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on August 13, 2008, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.
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