Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hungry Horse in Flathead County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Bad Rock Canyon

 
 
Bad Rock Canyon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 2, 2013
1. Bad Rock Canyon Marker
Inscription.
The Flathead River enters the valley through Bad Rock Canyon. Old-timers aver that a Blackfeet war party from the plains surged over the divide years ago seething with ambition to corral a choice assortment of cayuses and maybe a scalp or two from the unsuspecting Flatheads, who claimed this part of the country for range and bed grounds. They came with stealth and breezed out with haste and horses.

This foray put the home folks on the prod. They lined out on the trail of those vanishing intruders, determined to reclaim their mounts and their honor.

The departing Blackfeet anticipated some such caper so, cunning and agile as squirrels, they took to a projecting rib on the canyon wall and laid for the irate oncomers.

It developed into quite a disturbance. Many a warrior joined his fathers in the Great Beyond that day. Sorrowful relatives thereafter referred to that ill-omened citadel as Bad Rock.
 
Erected by Montana Highway Commission.
 
Location. 48° 23.127′ N, 114° 6.225′ W. Marker is near Hungry Horse, Montana, in Flathead County. Marker is on U.S. 2 half a mile east of Berne Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located in a pullout on the
Bad Rock Canyon Marker (<b><i>wide view</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 2, 2013
2. Bad Rock Canyon Marker (wide view)
south side of U.S. Highway 2, across from the Flathead River. Marker is in this post office area: Hungry Horse MT 59919, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Surrounded by Wilderness (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hungry Horse Clearing Ball (approx. 1.9 miles away); The Legend of Hungry Horse (approx. 1.9 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is wooden and severely weathered.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bad Rock Canyon.
The Great Northern Railway was constructed through BadrockCanyon in 1891. Prior to that, in 1890, the railroad contracted with Shepard Siems & Company to construct a road on the opposite side of the river to carry supplies to the railroad workers. The high canyon walls on the south side of the river were a major obstacle to the contractor, requiring extensive blasting to carve the road high above the canyon’s floor. When completed in 1891, the road was so steep in places that wagons had to be lowered down it by ropes tied to trees – thus it was called the “Tote Road” by the local residents. It was not until sometime between 1906 and 1914 that the county built a new highway through the canyon, bypassing the old tote road with a more user-friendly thoroughfare. (Submitted on March 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Bad Rock Canyon Marker (<b><i>marker top detail</b></i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 2, 2013
3. Bad Rock Canyon Marker (marker top detail)
 

2. Blackfoot Indian Facts.
The Blackfoot population was known for being difficult to get along with. They fought with those living in close proximity to them including the Assiniboine, Cree, Crows, Flatheads, Kutenai, and the Sioux. (Submitted on March 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Ql’ispé (Pend d’Oreille or Kalispel) and Séliš (Salish or Flathead) People.
In the Salish language, the people the Europeans named the “Flathead” called themselves Séliš (pronounced SEH-lish) which is anglicized as Salish. There are a number of possible historical explanations for why the Salish were referred to as Flatheads, but the name is a misnomer. (Submitted on March 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 24, 2017, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement