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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlottesville in Albemarle County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial

“The Hill that Heals”

 
 
The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
1. The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial Marker
Inscription. Dedicated to the lasting memory of all who served our country in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

Champ Jackson Lawson, Jr. — 04 November 1965
Grandville Reynard Jones, Jr. — 05 December 1965
Oscar Mauterer — 15 February 1966
John Devon Tyler — 21 July 1966
Erskine Buford Wilde — 27 July 1966
Thomas Dennison Grinell, III — 03 September 1966
Walter Franklin Payne — 05 October 1966
Harvey Mulhauser — 31 January 1967
Douglas Delano Wallace — 29 April 1967
Charles Rudolph Milton, Jr. — 15 May 1967
Allen Edward Firth — 18 October 1967
Howard Eslie Hollar — 06 March 1968
Roger Mark Link — 26 March 1968
Carl Reed Gibson — 30 April 1968
Rodolph Lee Nunn, Jr. — 06 June 1968
Robert Edward Marshall — 25 November 1968
Edward Alan Lamb — 31 January 1969
Clyde Randolph Perry, Jr. — 22 May 1969
Gerald Lewis Caton — 17 August 1969
James Marion Kardos — 04 September 1969
Charles King Butler — 28 December 1969
Robert Hoyt Ruggles — 21 January 1970
Richard Thomas Carter — 23 January 1970
Wayne Dabney McRay — 14 February 1970
Floyd Burnett Coates — 25 March 1970
Howell
The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
2. The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial
Frank Blakey — 11 April 1970
Walter Ross, Jr. — 09 July 1970
Wayne Shelby Craig — 30 May 1971

And especially those from the Charlottesville and Albemarle area who gave their lives in that service.
 
Erected 1966 by The Charlottesville Dogwood Festival Board of Directors. Renovated and expanded in 2014-2015.
 
Location. 38° 2.61′ N, 78° 28.5′ W. Marker is in Charlottesville, Virginia, in Albemarle County. Marker is on Bypass U.S. 250 near John W. Warner Parkway and McIntire Road, on the right. Touch for map. It is at the northwest corner of the interchange. Park at McIntire Skate Park, accessible from the westbound lanes of the bypass. There is an unimproved walkway through the former McIntire Park golf course to the memorial. Marker is in this post office area: Charlottesville VA 22901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Dogwood Vietnam Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Monticello Wine Company (approx. half a mile away); Walter “Rock” Greene Albert “AP” Moore Gymnasium (approx. 0.7 miles away); Gen. Alexander Archer Vandegrift
The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
3. The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial
(approx. 0.8 miles away); Jack Jouett’s Ride (approx. 0.8 miles away); Triumph of “The Charlottesville Twelve” (approx. 0.8 miles away); Thomas Jonathan Jackson (approx. 0.8 miles away); Historic Courthouse Square (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
Regarding The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial. Created in 1966, it is considered the first such memorial in the country.
 
Also see . . .  Charlottesville Dogwood Vietnam Memorial. “The Charlottesville Dogwood Vietnam Memorial was the first Civic/Public Memorial in the United States dedicated to those who served and sacrificed their lives in the service to their country in the war in Vietnam. The first Albemarle / Charlottesville Vietnam War casualty was SP4 Champ Jackson Lawson, Jr. Dogwood Festival Board Members, Bill Gentry, Jim Shisler, and Ken Staples, had the vision and presented the memorial project to the Festival Board. The project was adopted and named the Charlottesville Dogwood Vietnam Memorial. The knoll which protrudes close to the US 250 Bypass and is situated
The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
4. The Dogwood Vietnam Memorial
Panels with a photograph and brief biographies of each fallen veteran face the American flag.
The images that follow are taken from left to right.
just west of McIntire Road was chosen for the memorial site. Jim Shisler met with Charlottesville City Manager, James Bowen, and obtained permission for the site and construction of the memorial. They agreed that no city funds would be used to build the memorial. The purpose of the memorial was stated as, ‘The Dogwood Memorial dedicated to the lasting memory of these men and all who served our country in Vietnam.’” (Submitted on April 15, 2017.) 
 
Categories. War, Vietnam
 
Specialist Four Champ Jackson Lawson, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
5. Specialist Four Champ Jackson Lawson, Jr.
A Co. 4th AVN BN, 1st Cav Div Airmobile USARV, United States Army.

June 07, 1947 to November 04, 1965.

Champ was awarded 4 medals during his service including the Air Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal.

Specialist Four Lawson was killed in a helicopter mid-air collision near An Khe during a combat assault. He is buried in Holly Memorial Gardens, Charlottesville, Va.

VFW Post 2044 in Earlysville, VA was named the “Champ J. Lawson VFW Post 2044” in his honor.
PFC Grandville Reynard Jones, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
6. PFC Grandville Reynard Jones, Jr.
B Co., 2nd BN, 2nd Infantry, 1 INF DIV, United States Army.

May 26, 1941 to December 05, 1965.

Tony was born in New York City. His father’s job at Sperry brought Tony to Charlottesville. In 1959, he graduated from Lane High School Then in 1964, he received a B.S. in education from the University of Virginia. Tony made friends easily and was always smiling & laughing. He entered the US Army in 1964 & arrived in Vietnam August 16, 1965. Participating in Operation BUSHMASTER II 40 miles northwest of Saigon, Tony’s unit was caught in a crossfire and he was killed in action by enemy machine gunfire.

PFC Jones was awarded the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service, Vietnam Service and Vietnam Campaign medals and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Sergeant John Devon Tyler image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
7. Sergeant John Devon Tyler
228th Sig Co., 41st Sig BN, 2nd Sig Group, 1st Signal Brigade, USARV, United States Army.

February 01, 1932 to July 21, 1966.

John was born and raised in Charlottesville. He graduated from Jefferson High School in 1951. John was married to Gladys E. Tyler. They had a son, Marvin and two daughters, Karen and Kimberly. He worked in the Downtown Bakery before he entered the Army Air Corps and served in Korea. In 1953, he joined the US Army. He was a Multi-Channel Transmission Systems Specialist in the 41st Signal Battalion.He arrived in Vietnam August 17, 1965. He was killed July 21, 1966.

He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery.
PFC Erskine Buford Wilde image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
8. PFC Erskine Buford Wilde
B Btry, 6th BN, 14th Artillery, 52nd Artillery Group, I Field Force, USARV, United States Army.

December 29, 1946 to July 27, 1966

Erskine was born and raised in Charlottesville. He attended Belfield School and graduated in 1965 from Episcopal High School in Alexandria with honors in German. He had a brother, James D. Wilde, IV. He enlisted in the U.S. Army July 1965 and volunteered for duty in Vietnam. He arrived in country January 22, 1966. He was killed by a land mine. At the time of his death, he was supporting the First Air Calvary Division.

He was awarded the Purple Heart, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, Parachutists Wings and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is buried in St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Ivy VA.
Lance Corporal Thomas D. Grinnell III image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
9. Lance Corporal Thomas D. Grinnell III
H&S Co., 2nd BN, 26th Marines, 3rd Mardiv, III MAF, United States Marine Corps.

October 06, 1945 to September 03, 1966

Tam attended Branchlands School then Lane High School in Charlottesville, VA. His family moved to Richmond, VA for his senior year, where he went to Thomas Jefferson High School. In 1964 Tam enlisted in the USMC. After Basic in PISC, he was sent to Communications School. As Radio Operator he was always a target due to the radio antenna. Tam was killed in action when the Jeep he was in ran over a landmine near DaNang in Quang Nam Province. He was due to rotate home in 13 days.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Tam is buried in Monticello Memory Gardens between his mother and father.
Staff Sergeant Walter Franklin Payne image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
10. Staff Sergeant Walter Franklin Payne
C Co., 2nd BN, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cav Div., USARV, United States Army.

April 09, 1931 to October 05, 1966

Walter's home of record is Baltimore Maryland. But he was drafted by the Charlottesville / Albemarle Draft Board. He had one sister, Evelyn Jayne Fleming, of Baltimore. At the time of his death, he had 14 years in the Army, including service in the Korean War. He died from wounds received from fragments of an unknown device that exploded in his base camp. He had been in Vietnam since December 16, 1965.

He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Infantryman Badge. He is buried in Baltimore National Cemetery in Baltimore Maryland.
Captain Harvey Mulhauser image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
11. Captain Harvey Mulhauser
12th Air Commando Squadron, 315th AC Wing, 7th AF, United States Air Force.

March 01, 1933 to January 31, 1967

Harvey was born in North Carolina. He moved to Charlottesville when his mother took a nursing job at the University of Virginia. Harvey graduated from Lane High School in 1951. He attended St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. He went to UVa on a USAF ROTC scholarship where he served as Director of the UVa Marching Band. Graduating in 1955, he entered the USAF and married Jane Russell Lawson. They had three children, David, Anne and Robert. While on a defoliation mission, his C-123 aircraft was struck by hostile fire and crashed.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the Air Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. His remains were not recovered, but he had a memorial stone at Arlington National Cemetery.
PFC Douglas Delano Wallace image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
12. PFC Douglas Delano Wallace
F Co, 2nd BN, 9th Marines, 3rd MarDiv, III MAF, United States Marine corp

August 24, 1948 to April 29, 1967

His parents lived in Gordonsville, but Doug lived in Charlottesville with his aunt and uncle, Reverend & Mrs. James Johnson. Doug had 2 younger brothers, Donald & Dwight. His father served as a 1st Lieutenant in World War I. Doug attended Burley High School for one year and later transferred to Lane High School where he played trombone in the school band. He graduated from lane in 1966 and on his 18th birthday he enlisted in the USMC. Doug was killed in action by mortar fire in Thua Thien Province near Hue/Phu Bai while on combat patrol.

PFC Wallace was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Sergeant Allen Edward Firth image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
13. Sergeant Allen Edward Firth
H Co, 2nd BN, 1st Marines, 1st MarDiv, III MAF, United States Marine Corps.

December 16, 1941 to October 18, 1967

Allen graduated from Albemarle High School in 1959. He then attended the University of Virginia while working for Stromberg-Carlson. The day after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Allen, a fourth year student, left UVa and enlisted in the USMC. In Vietnam he was assigned Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of a Combined Action Program unit where the marines lived with and protected a village. While on patrol in Quang Tri, his unit was ambushed and he was killed in action while carrying a wounded Marine to safety.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, and the Combat Action Ribbon. He is buried in Culpeper National Cemetery in Culpeper, VA.
PFC Howard Eslie Hollar image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
14. PFC Howard Eslie Hollar
H&S Co, 1st BN, 26th Marines, 3rd MarDiv, III MAF, United Stated Marine Corps.

February 06, 1948 to March 06, 1968

Howard was born in Hickory North Carolina and moved to Charlottesville in 1957. As a teen, he worked at the Humpty Dumpty Drive-In Restaurant. He attended Lane High School with his friends Sam Herring Jr. (Corporal, USMC), Sandi Overton, Rick Breeden and Dale Yager. After graduation in 1967 he joined the USMC. With 8 months left in the USMC he was sent to Vietnam to reinforce the Khe Sahn Combat Base that was under siege. The C-123 he was in was hit by gunfire and crashed into a mountain.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Howard is buried in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, St. Louis, MO.
PFC Roger Mark Link image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
15. PFC Roger Mark Link
B Co, 1st BN, 502nd Infantry, 101st Airborne Div., USARV, United States Army.

September 22, 1946 to March 1968

Roger and his brother Peter were raised in Ivy, Virginia. A high school friend, Bert O’Malley, said he was a cool, smart, funny, hell-raising party guy and a seriously deep thinker. His home of record was Dallas Texas where he and his wife, Elizabeth Rowalt Link had moved. He arrived in Vietnam on January 1, 1968. He was killed by artillery in the midst of a firefight when an enemy force was encountered during a combat operation in Thua Thien Province.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, Parachutists Wings and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. He is buried in Restland Memorial Park in Dallas Texas.
Second Lieutenant Carl Reed Gibson image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
16. Second Lieutenant Carl Reed Gibson
3rd BN, 12th Marines, 3rd MarDiv, United States Marine Corps.

May 31, 1945 to April 30, 1968

Carl was raised in Charlottesville and graduated from the University of Virginia where he was The Cavalier Daily manager, a member of Kappa Sigma Fraternity, on the soccer team, and on the Dean’s list. As a NROTC scholarship recipient, he commanded the Drill Team and the Drum and Bugle Corps. At this USMC commissioning in 1967, he was presented the special leadership award, a Marine Officer’s Sword. That same year he married Sallie Anne Guerant of Charlottesville. Carl participated in the Battle of Dai Do as a Field Commander. He was killed in action by a sniper’s round.

He was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Carl is buried on the Grounds at UVa.
Lieutenant Colonel Rodolph Lee Nunn Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
17. Lieutenant Colonel Rodolph Lee Nunn Jr.
1st Air Commando Squadron, 56th AC Wing, 7th AF, United States Air Force.

April 23, 1929 to June 06, 1968

Rudy was born in Kingston, North Carolina and graduated from The Citadel in 1951. His first assignment was in Korea for two years. Next was Boston, where he met his wife Andree Foisy, and they had two sons, See and David. After a tour of France, he was ordered to a University of Virginia USAF ROTC staff position. The family stayed in Charlottesville while he was in Vietnam. During a close air support mission at Khe Sahn in Quang Tri Province, his A1E Skyraider was shot down by ground fire. Eleven months later his body was recovered.

Rudy was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart Medal, three Air Medals, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Warrant Officer Robert Edward Marshall image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
18. Warrant Officer Robert Edward Marshall
HQ Battery, 1st BN, 12th Marines, 3rd MarDiv, III MAF, United States Marine Corps.

April 20, 1940 to November 25, 1968

Bobby was born and raised in Charlottesville on Montrose Avenue with his five brothers, Monty Ray, Harry Jr., Fulton, Wayne and Wendell. He attended Lane High School and finished his education in the USMC. Bobby had been in Vietnam five months when he was killed in an ammunition dump fire and explosion at Fire Support Base C-2. Bobby was married to Mary Jane Gregory and had three daughters, Bobbie Jane, Sandra Dee and Susan Elaine.

Warrant Officer Marshall was awarded the Bronze Star with ‘V’ device for Combat Valor. The Marine Good Conduct Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Bobby is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
Specialist Four Clyde Randolph Perry, Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
19. Specialist Four Clyde Randolph Perry, Jr.
B Co. 1st BN, 502nd Infantry, 101st ABN Div. USARV, United States Army.

August 16, 1947 to May 22, 1969.

Clyde was born in Charlottesville to Mr. And Mrs. Clyde R. Perry Sr. of 25 Monte Vista Avenue. He graduated from Lane High School in 1965. He was a member of the Hinton Avenue Methodist Church. He was drafted and arrived in Vietnam on November 14, 1968. Specialist Perry was a Material Storage and Handling Specialist. He was intentionally killed at Long Bien, Bien Hoa Province by another person in a non-combat situation.

He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is buried in Holly Memorial Gardens in Albemarle County, VA.
Warrant Officer-1 Gerald Lewis Caton image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
20. Warrant Officer-1 Gerald Lewis Caton
HQ & Spt Co., 326th Medical BN, 101st ABN Div (AMBL), United States Army.

November 16, 1945 to August 17, 1969

Gerald was raised in Springfield, Virginia. His brother, Douglas E Caton, is a Major General, U.S. Army Retired. Gerald graduated from Robert E. Lee High School and enrolled in the University of Virginia in 1964. He was 3rd year student majoring in geology when he enlisted in the army. He received his Army Airman’s Wings and was flying as a copilot on a military medevac mission in Thua Thien Province when the aircraft received ground fire from a hostile force, crashed and burned.

WO-1 Caton was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, the Air Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.
PFC James Marion Kardos image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
21. PFC James Marion Kardos
D Co., 3rd BN, 1st Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, USARV, United States Army.

April 07, 1949 to September 04, 1969

Jimmy lived his entire life a few blocks from this memorial. Among his many friends were Jim Carpenter, Buster Ruggles and his girlfriend Adele Marshall. In 1968 he graduated from Lane High School. September 4, 1969, while on patrol 10 kilometers west northwest of Quang Ngai Airfield, a command detonated landmine was triggered, and Jimmie Kardos was killed. He had been in Vietnam twenty days.

Private First Class Kardos was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal and the Combat Infantryman Badge. Jimmie is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Charlottesville, VA.
First Lieutenant Charles King Butler image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
22. First Lieutenant Charles King Butler
HMM-364, MAG-16, 1st MAW, United States Marine Corps.

March 30, 1945 to December 28, 1969

Chip was raised on Rugby Road and attended First United Methodist Church. He graduated from Lane High School in 1963 where he was friends with Charlie Crenshaw and Roy Clements. He joined the Air Force ROTC at East Carolina University and also Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. Chip married Mary L. Johnson of Morganton, North Carolina and became a USMC UH-45 helicopter pilot. He died on a night mission when his instruments failed, crashing into a mountain near Hai Van Pass.

First Lieutenant Butler received two Distinguished Flying Crosses for exceptional heroism, the Air Medal, the National Defense Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Chip Butler is buried at Olive Branch Cemetery in Gasburg, VA.
Specialist Four Richard Thomas Carter image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
23. Specialist Four Richard Thomas Carter
E Co., 4th BN, 9th Infantry, 25th Infantry Div., USARV, United States Army

December 10, 1945 to January 25, 1970

Richard graduated from the University of Virginia Phi Beta Kappa. His dream to become a history professor was cut short when he died less than six months after arriving in Vietnam, and less than a month after he was named “Soldier of the Month” in December 1969.

He received 9 medals including the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, the Army Commendation Medal, and the Combat Infantryman’s Badge. Richard is buried at Monticello Memorial Park in Charlottesville, VA.
PFC Robert Hoyt Ruggles image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
24. PFC Robert Hoyt Ruggles
C Co., 4th BN, 12th Infantry, 119th Infantry Brigade, United States Army.

August 06, 1948 to January 21, 1970

Buster was born in Charlottesville. He graduated from Rock Hill Academy in 1966. He married Linda McAllister and they had a son, Timothy. While employed by Michie Printing, he was drafted in the army. September 1964 he arrived in Vietnam. In 1970, his work party was assigned to unload a truck when a case of 81mm mortar shells was accidentally dropped. It exploded killing the entire work party. Jam Scruggs, the founder of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in D.C. said that this event inspired him to build the National Vietnam Memorial.

Buster was awarded the Bronze Star, the National Defense Service, the Vietnam Service, and the Vietnam Campaign Medals. He is buried in Monticello Memory Gardens.
Specialist Four Wayne Dabney Mc Ray image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
25. Specialist Four Wayne Dabney Mc Ray
C Troop, First Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry, USARV, United States Army.

January 03, 1948 to February 14, 1970

Wayne graduated from Lane High School in 1968. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle with friends and watching flicks with high school sweetheart Jean Shipp Seal. They were planning to get married upon his return from Vietnam. He worked at the Ridge Drive-In Theater before being drafted in the Army June, 1969. Wayne was kipped while serving as a gunner on a convoy vehicle that was ambushed. He was declared Missing In Action February 14, then Killed In Action February 24 when his body was recovered.

He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is buried at Holly Memorial Gardens, Albemarle County, VA.
Specialist Four Floyd Burnett Coates image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
26. Specialist Four Floyd Burnett Coates
A Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry, USARV, United States Army.

August 15, 1949 to March 25, 1970

Floyd was born in Culpeper Virginia in 1969. He was drafted into the army by the Charlottesville / Albemarle County Draft Board. He was trained as an Indirect Fire Infantryman (Mortar Man). He arrived in Vietnam October 11, 1969. As a member of an 81mm mortar crew, Spec 4 Coates was killed March 25, 1970 when a mortar round exploded in the tube in Tay Ninh Province, Vietnam.

He was awarded the Bronze Star Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. Specialist Four Coates is buried in Fairview Cemetery, Culpeper Virginia.
Lance Corporal Howell Frank Blakey image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
27. Lance Corporal Howell Frank Blakey
Cap 1-3-8, CACO 1-3, 1st CAG, Combined Action, III MAF, United States Marine Corps.

November 28, 1948 to April 11, 1970

Howell graduated from Jackson P. Burley High School in 1967. He studied agribusiness at Virginia State University. His sister Pauline said he always wanted to be a farmer. He was a member of a Combined Action Platoon that lived with and protected a Vietnamese village. On April 11, 1970, Howie’s patrol was ambushed. He stayed under fire while ordering the other two marines to go for help. When relief arrived, he was found killed in action.

LCpl Blakey was awarded the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Howie is buried in his backyard in Free Union, Va, next to his mother.
Lance Corporal Walter Ross Jr. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
28. Lance Corporal Walter Ross Jr.
L Co., 3rd BN, 1st Marines, 1st MarDiv, III MAF, United States Marine Corps.

January 08, 1949 to July 09, 1970

Walter graduated from Fluvanna County High School in 1968. He was drafted by the Charlottesville / Albemarle Draft Board into the USMC that same year. With only 9 months left in Vietnam, Walter sent his mother a letter in which he said he had befriended two young Vietnamese orphans that he wanted to bring home. Walter was killed in action from small arms fire during a battle in Quang Nam Province.

LCpl Walter Ross Jr. was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with ‘V’ Device for Combat Valor, the Purple Heart Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal and the Vietnam Campaign Medal. Walter is buried in the Cloverdale Baptist Church Cemetery in Bremo Bluff.
Specialist Four Wayne Shelby Craig image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
29. Specialist Four Wayne Shelby Craig
B Co., 1st Bn, 46th Infantry, Americal Div., USARV, United States Army.

July 27, 1949 to May 30, 1971

Wayne lived in Albemarle County and attended Albemarle High School. A high school friend, Larry Claytor, remembered him from Albemarle High School and living in the Greenwood area. Wayne left high school in 1967 and joined the army. He married Linda Robertson on December 24, 1970. He had one brother, Jacob, and three sisters, Betty Sue, Ruth (Kirby) and Mary (Thacker). He was killed in Quang Nam Province South Vietnam on May 30, 1971 while on a military mission when a grenade detonated.

Wayne was awarded the National Defense Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, Afton, VA.
The POW-MIA Flag is Flown on the Right Side of the Memorial image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
30. The POW-MIA Flag is Flown on the Right Side of the Memorial
Under this flag is the panel for Colonel Oscar Mauterer with his photograph and short biography. His panel is reproduced in the next image.
Colonel Oscar Mauterer image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, April 8, 2017
31. Colonel Oscar Mauterer
602nd Fighter Squadron, 3rd TFW, 13th AF, United States Air Force

August 29, 1925 to February 15, 1966 (POW-MIA)

Oscar was born and raised in New Jersey. In 1944, he joined the Army Air Corps and served as a B-29 navigator. He was a devoted husband and father of two children, Pam and Randall. Oscar spent his last five years, prior to Vietnam, serving in Charlottesville as a USAF ROTC instructor at the University of Virginia. In 1966 his A1E Skyraider was struck by enemy ground fire and he parachuted from his burning aircraft. He was seen alive by his wingman, but he was never found.

Through the years, reports surfaced that Oscar was captured and/or killed by Pathet Lao. On December 01, 1977, Oscar Mauterer was posthumously promoted to Colonel and officially declared dead. He has a memorial headstone in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 30, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 14, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 227 times since then. This page was the Marker of the Week April 30, 2017. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31. submitted on April 15, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
 
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