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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxnard in Ventura County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

“La Jenelle”

 
 
"La Jenelle" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 21, 2017
1. "La Jenelle" Marker
Inscription.
Buried beneath this beach is the 467–foot hull of the “La Jenelle”. The luxury liner was driven aground at this site during a coastal storm on April 13, 1970. The State Lands Commission coordinated a joint federal, state and local governmental effort to convert the remains of the derelict ship from a safety hazard to this recreational area for public benefit. This beachside park and fishing area, constructed with state funds is maintained by the County of Ventura.
 
Location. 34° 8.804′ N, 119° 12.962′ W. Marker is in Oxnard, California, in Ventura County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Ocean Drive and Sawtelle Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the beach at La Jenelle Park. Marker is in this post office area: Oxnard CA 93035, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Olive (approx. 2 miles away); The Oxnard Pagoda (approx. 4.1 miles away); F-14 Tomcat (approx. 6.7 miles away); Olivas Adobe (approx. 6.9 miles away); a different marker also named Olivas Adobe (approx. 6.9 miles away); Chumash Hutash Fiesta
"La Jenelle" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 21, 2017
2. "La Jenelle" Marker
(approx. 10.2 miles away); Erle Stanley Gardner’s Law Office (approx. 10.3 miles away); Old County Court House (approx. 10.4 miles away).
 
More about this marker. More information and artifacts from "La Jenelle" can bee seen at the Channel Islands Maritime Museum which generously aided in documenting this marker.
 
Regarding "La Jenelle".
“La Jenelle” is known as the ship with five names. Launched in 1930 as the “Borinquen”, she operated from New York to islands in the Caribbean. Requisitioned during World War II, she carried troops and cargo to English, Mediterranean and African ports. She was a hospital ship at the D-Day landings in Normandy. In 1949 she was sold and renamed “Puerto Rico”. In 1954 she was modernized by the Arosa Steamship Line and named the “Arosa Star”. When the line went bankrupt in 1959 she was sold to the Eastern Steamship Line and named “Bahama Star”. In 1965 she rescued 489 people from the burning “SS Yarmouth Castle”, another cruise ship. This disaster led to regulations banning passenger vessels with wooden super-structures, like “Bahama Star”. She was renamed “La Jenelle” in 1969 and brought to
Parts of the Wreck are Occasionally Uncovered image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 21, 2017
3. Parts of the Wreck are Occasionally Uncovered
Port Hueneme, California to be converted to a casino. These plans never materialized and in 1970, she dragged anchor and was grounded. She was broken up in place and covered with rocks and sand to form the breakwaters and beach here.
 
Also see . . .
1. Channel Islands Maritime Museum. (Submitted on April 22, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Photos of the wreck from the Los Angeles Times. (Submitted on April 22, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Artifacts from “La Jenelle” at the Channel Islands Maritime Museum image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, April 21, 2017
4. Artifacts from “La Jenelle” at the Channel Islands Maritime Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on April 22, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 293 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 22, 2017, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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