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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Benjamin in Knox County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Quanah Parker Trail

Texas Plains Trail Region

 
 
Quanah Parker Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 9, 2017
1. Quanah Parker Trail Marker
Inscription.
Comanches, Kiowas & Apaches used a
well-marked trail over “The Narrows”
that US 82/SH 114 follows today
Arrow Sculptor: Charles A. Smith

 
Location. 33° 35.053′ N, 99° 47.462′ W. Marker is in Benjamin, Texas, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of East Hayes Street (U.S. 82) and North Bedford Street, on the right when traveling west on East Hayes Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Benjamin TX 79505, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Knox County (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Settlement in Knox County / L – Ranch (about 600 feet away); Original Old Rock Courthouse Cornerstone (about 800 feet away); Pleasant C. Sams (approx. 4.3 miles away); The Narrows (approx. 4.3 miles away); Brazos River Bridge (approx. 5.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Quanah Parker Trail. A 22-foot-tall steel arrow by artist Charles A. Smith marks sites where the Comanches, and their last chief, Quanah Parker, hunted, traded, lived, traveled, and fought. (Submitted on July 5, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
Quanah Parker Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 9, 2017
2. Quanah Parker Trail Marker
Quanah Parker Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 9, 2017
3. Quanah Parker Trail Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 5, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 5, 2017, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.
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