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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Founding of Kappa Alpha Order

 
 
Founding of Kappa Alpha Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 11, 2017
1. Founding of Kappa Alpha Order Marker
Inscription. One half mile east, students at Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) founded Kappa Alpha in 1865. The fraternity held its first meetings on campus, at the Lexington Hotel, and at the Ann Smith Academy. Members modeled their organization on the gentlemanly conduct they believed was best exemplified by Robert E. Lee, the college president. New chapters took root across the South and beyond. Kappa Alpha Order’s philanthropic efforts have aided the Muscular Dystrophy Association. In 2004 the fraternity moved its National Administrative Office here to Mulberry Hill, which is listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected 2014 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number I-30.)
 
Location. 37° 47.317′ N, 79° 26.932′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of West Nelson Street (U.S. 60) and Liberty Hall Road, on the right when traveling north on West Nelson Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lexington VA 24450, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Liberty Hall Academy Ruins (approx. ¼ mile away); Last Home of Traveller
Founding of Kappa Alpha Order Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 11, 2017
2. Founding of Kappa Alpha Order Marker
(approx. ¼ mile away); Liberty Hall Academy (approx. 0.3 miles away); John Chavis (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lee-Jackson House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Morris House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Alben W. Barkley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Cyrus Hall McCormick (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
Also see . . .  . “However, the school’s trustees were determined to save their desperate college. On August 4, 1865, they met to discuss applying for a loan and the prospects for the college’s presidency. At that meeting, a board member rose and said that he had heard that General Lee was looking for a position that would allow him to earn a living for his family. The trustees immediately elected Lee as president – contingent on his acceptance, of course. They offered him an annual salary of $1,500, and the use of a house and garden and a small percentage of the tuition. Everyone in the country knew that Lee could lead soldiers, but few remembered that he also had served as superintendent of the United States Military
Mulberry Hill, Kappa Alpha Order National Administrative Office image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 11, 2017
3. Mulberry Hill, Kappa Alpha Order National Administrative Office
Academy at West Point. For Lee, the position in tiny Lexington was an opportunity to lead his people, not into battle, but into recovery. On August 31, 1865, Lee became the president of a school named for his mentor and his wife’s grandfather, George Washington.” (Submitted on July 5, 2017.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkFraternal or Sororal Organizations
 
Mulberry Hill image. Click for full size.
Jerrye & Roy Klotz M.D. via Wikipedia Commons, October 26, 2015
4. Mulberry Hill
“Built in at least four different building periods that range from the late-18th century to the early 20th century. The original section was built about 1798. Rev. William Graham, a Presbyterian minister and rector of Liberty Hill Academy (the predecessor of Washington & Lee University), built the original plantation house. It is now the headquarters of the Kappa Alpha Educational Foundation.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 5, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 5, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 5, 2017, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of Mulberry Hill • Can you help?
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