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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Carthage in Panola County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

International Boundary Marker

 
 
International Boundary Marker Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
1. International Boundary Marker Marker
Inscription. In the early 1700s, France and Spain began disputing their New World international boundary that included this area; each nation claimed what is now Texas. When the U.S. purchased the Louisiana Territory from France in 1803, the boundary was still in dispute. Leaders agreed to a neutral area between the Arroyo Hondo and the Sabine River, and the 1819 Adams-Onís Treaty formally defined the border. When Texas became a republic in 1836, it appointed a joint commission with the U.S. to survey and mark the established boundary from the Gulf of Mexico up the Sabine River and on to the Red River. John Forsyth represented the U.S., and Memucan Hunt represented Texas in the work, which proved to be long and difficult.

The survey crew began the demarcation process on May 20, 1840 at the Gulf, placing a 36-foot pole in the middle of a large earthen mound. Proceeding north, they placed eight-foot posts denoting the number of miles from the 32nd parallel. Upon reaching the parallel, they placed a granite marker on the west bank of the Sabine River. From that point, they traveled due north to the Red River, completing their work in late June 1841.

As a result of erosion, the first granite marker on the Sabine fell into the river long ago, but a second granite marker on the northward path of the surveyors had been placed here
International Boundary marker and granite stone post. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
2. International Boundary marker and granite stone post.
to mark the north-south meridian. This is the only known marker remaining, and it is believed to be the only original international boundary marker within the contiguous U.S. Today, the border between Texas and Louisiana follows the Sabine River to the 32nd parallel, at which point it connects to the boundary established by Hunt and Forsyth. The Texas Historical Foundation purchased this site to provide public access to the early boundary marker.
 
Erected 2004 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13056.)
 
Location. 32° 2.039′ N, 94° 2.567′ W. Marker is near Carthage, Texas, in Panola County. Marker can be reached from Farm to Market Road 31 0.4 miles south of County Road 4557, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located in a very rural area of the county is some 10 miles from Deadwood and 21 miles from Carthage. Marker is in this post office area: Carthage TX 75633, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named International Boundary Marker (here, next to this marker); International Boundary (within shouting distance of this marker in Louisiana).
 
Also see . . .  Texas Escapes on the Last Remaining International Boundary for The Republic of Texas.
Granite stone post International Boundary Marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton
3. Granite stone post International Boundary Marker.
Sides read: Meridn Boundary Established A.D. 1840
U.S. = United States
RT = Republic of Texas
(Submitted on July 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. ExplorationNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
Historic Civil Engineering Landmark plaque. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
4. Historic Civil Engineering Landmark plaque.
Lower plaques on this marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
5. Lower plaques on this marker.
Rectangular plaque: Sponsored by the Sons of the Republic of Texas in appreciation of the historians from Panola County, Texas and De Soto Parish, Louisiana for their diligent work in obtaining and preserving this historic site.
Round plaque: Historic Site of the Republic of Texas, The Daughters of the Republic of Texas
View from the Louisiana/Texas border into Texas. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 28, 2017
6. View from the Louisiana/Texas border into Texas.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 9, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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