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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Wayan in Caribou County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

John Grey

 
 
John Grey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 21, 2017
1. John Grey Marker
Inscription. Discovered this valley in 1818 or 1819 while hunting beaver for Donald MacKenzie's Northwest Company trappers.
An Iroquois leader -- he also explored Grey's River nearby in Wyoming. Aside from his trapping skills, he was noted for his unusual aptitude in fighting grizzly bears. After trapping in this country for 20 years, he retired with is Iroquois band in 1836 to help found Kansas City, Missouri
 
Erected by Idaho Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 362.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Idaho State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 42° 58.604′ N, 111° 22.639′ W. Marker is near Wayan, Idaho, in Caribou County. Marker is on Wayan Loop Road (State Highway 34) near Wayan Loop Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3956 Wayan Loop Road, Wayan ID 83285, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cariboo Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Grays Lake Valley (within shouting distance of this marker); Tincup Creek (approx. 9.6 miles away); China Hat Geological Site (approx. 14.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
John Grey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 21, 2017
2. John Grey Marker
This marker is the closest, on the right.

1. John Gray and Ignace Hatchiorauquasha -- Goldfields. Gray was half Scottish and half Iroquois, a St. Regis Mohawk, born around 1795 in upstate New York...Gray entered the fur trade sometime around 1818, about the same time that he married his wife Marienne, also a Mohawk. He was active in the fur trade for the next 25 years or so... after which he retired to his home in Kansas City, Missouri. He was killed in 1848 in a dispute with a neighbor. (Submitted on July 23, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Iroquois Fur Trade in Idaho -- Idaho Historical Society. North West Company fur traders, operating in Idaho from remote bases in Montreal and Fort William, brought out a remarkable variety of trappers from distant lands. These included Abanakee and Iroquois Indians from Quebec, other Indians from Ontario, Crees from northern Canada, and Hawaiians from a very different South Pacific climate. By 1820, about a third of those who hunted fur in Pacific Northwest beaver streams were Iroquois. (Submitted on July 23, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationNative Americans
 
Father Nicholas Point's sketch of John Gray image. Click for full size.
By Father Nicholas Point
3. Father Nicholas Point's sketch of John Gray
Father Point's 1841 on-scene sketch of John Gray's historic battle with the five grizzly bears image. Click for full size.
By Father Nicholas Point, circa 1841
4. Father Point's 1841 on-scene sketch of John Gray's historic battle with the five grizzly bears
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 23, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 117 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 23, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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