Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rockville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

George Washington Carver Junior College

Established 1950-51

 
 
George Washington Carver Junior College Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
1. George Washington Carver Junior College Marker
Inscription. Carver was the first accredited two-year junior college conducted under County Board of Education for post-secondary education of Negro students in Montgomery County. At the time, Lincoln High School, located in a historic black community in Rockville, was the only Negro high school in the county and night classes of the junior college were held there. Increasing enrollment led to the building of a new campus and facility at Hungerford Drive and Mannakee Street, which opened in 1951 as Carver High School and Junior College. After desegregation in 1954, Carver Junior College was merged in 1955 with Montgomery Junior College in Takoma Park, but Negro students still attended classes at Carver. The name George Washington Carver Junior College was no longer used after 1959. Now called Carver Educational Services Center, the site is currently the headquarters of the Montgomery County Public Schools.

Dedicated June 28, 1998, City of Rockville, Maryland, Historic District Commission
 
Erected 1998 by City of Rockville, Maryland, Historic District Commission.
 
Location. 39° 5.712′ N, 77° 9.437′ W. Marker is in Rockville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Ivy League Lane. Touch for map.

George Washington Carver Junior College Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
2. George Washington Carver Junior College Marker
Marker is at or near this postal address: Carver Educational Services Center 850 Hungerford, Rockville MD 20850, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Snowden Funeral Home (approx. 0.6 miles away); Rockvilleís First Colored Schools (approx. 0.6 miles away); Clinton A.M.E. Zion Church (approx. 0.6 miles away); Rockville Town Square (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mr. Tís (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Rockville Town Square (approx. 0.7 miles away); Rockville Methodist Episcopal Church - Jerusalem/Mount Pleasant (approx. 0.7 miles away); Lucy Simpson's Rockville Institute (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rockville.
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
Carver High School and Junior College image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
3. Carver High School and Junior College
Close-up of photo on marker
Maryland Educator<br>Dr. Parlett Longworth Moore image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
4. Maryland Educator
Dr. Parlett Longworth Moore
Born September 17, 1907 at Wetipquin, Md.
B.S. - Howard University
M.A. - Columbia University
Ed.D. - Temple University

While principal of Lincoln High School in Rockville, Md., Dr. Moore led the effort to establish and accredit George Washington Carver High School and Junior College, where he served as principal and dean. He was President of Coppin State College in Baltimore from 1956 to 1970, completing a distinguished 40-year career of service and leadership to Maryland education.
Close-up of photo on marker
<br><br>1951<br>Historic Property<br>City of Rockville image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
5.

1951
Historic Property
City of Rockville
Carver Educational Services Center image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 31, 2017
6. Carver Educational Services Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 1, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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