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Jordan Valley in Malheur County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Making Jordan Valley Home

 
 
Making Jordan Valley Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2017
1. Making Jordan Valley Home Marker
Captions: (bottom left) Agricultural ventures were flourishing by the 1870s. In 1888 alone an estimated 100,000 head of cattle roamed this range along with thousands of horses and sheep. The westward flow of livestock across the northern part of the state along the Oregon Trail during the previous three decades reversed course as heard of Oregon horses, cattle and sheep were driven east to Jordan Valley.; (bottom 2nd left) Squatters, claiming possessory rights by laying out a piece of land and occupying it, moved in during the late 1860s. Others has Preemption Claims, some took up Timber Culture claims, and finally the Homesteaders, who built more permanent homes. They laid the groundwork for Malheur County's number one industry today, agriculture.; (sidebar on right) A Prospering Community; (upper right) A bird's eye view of Jordan Valley in the early 1900s. Many of the buildings pictured here still exist. Note the pelota court in the upper left next to the hotel. (newspaper advertisements) A page of advertising from the local newspaper. Jordan Valley Express, September 29, 1910, displays a wide range of goods and services available.; (bottom right) Jordan Valley General Mercantile, circa 1930. Here one could by a suit of clothes for fifteen dollars.
Inscription. Before the discovery of gold along the banks of Jordan Creek on May 18, 1863, this arid region was the exclusive domain of American Indians, a few hardy explorers and Hudson's Bay Company fur traders. The prospect of gold quickly changed this attitude, and eastern Oregon became a destination for hundreds of miners. Merchants with heavily-laden pack animals quickly took advantage of the opportunity and so too did ranchers, woodcutters, blacksmiths, stone mason, carpenters, gamblers and a host of others from all walks of life.
The sudden population increase in this region alarmed local Native Americans, especially when miners and ranchers disturbed or took possession of their traditional hunting and food gathering areas. Harassing attacks intended to drive the newcomers away, only brought more white men - soldiers - to guard the trails and tiny settlements. This tragic conflict between two widely different cultures lasted 5 years until a treaty was signed in 1868.
The first hay farms sprung up along lower Jordan Creek in late 1863, and by 1865, large bands of cattle and sheep were on their way from California bound for the slaughtering pens of the mining camps. Mining gradually began to take second place to ranching and stock raising by the 1870s, but the import of cattle and sheep to feed the miners and the need for horses
Making Jordan Valley Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2017
2. Making Jordan Valley Home Marker
and mules for transportation was the beginning of the livestock industry in Jordan Valley.
 
Location. 42° 58.462′ N, 117° 3.177′ W. Marker is in Jordan Valley, Oregon, in Malheur County. Marker is on Bassett Street (U.S. 95) near Yturri Boulevard, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jordan Valley OR 97910, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within walking distance of this marker. Skinner's Toll Road (approx. 0.2 miles away).
 
Categories. AgricultureSettlements & Settlers
 
Making Jordan Valley Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2017
3. Making Jordan Valley Home Marker
Pelota court in the background
Pelota Court image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 27, 2017
4. Pelota Court
Jordan Valley
Ko
Frontolia
1915
Restored 1997
Danok Etorri


Basque pelota ... is the name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using one's hand, a racket, a wooden bat or a basket, against a wall (frontis or Fronton) or, more traditionally, with two teams face to face separated by a line on the ground or a net. - Wikipedia
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 12, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 12, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 12, 2017, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.
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