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Cape Girardeau in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Literary Giants/Missouri Mule

 
 
Literary Giants/Missouri Mule Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, August 12, 2012
1. Literary Giants/Missouri Mule Marker
Inscription. Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957) was born in Lund, WI. In 1894 she moved to Mansfield, Mo. where in the 1930s and 1940s she published her best selling Little House books chronicling her pioneer life. These books later became the basis for a long-running television series by the same name.

Tennessee William (1911-1983) born in Columbus, MS. An acclaimed southern playwright, he attended the University of Missouri and Washington University,. His better known works include The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, And A Street Car Named Desire.

Eugene Field (1850-1895) was born in St. Louis. Best known for his childrenís verse, Wynken, Blyken and Nom he had a successful career as A St. Joseph, Kansas city and St. Louis Journalist.

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was born in Joplin, MO. One of the Harlem Renaissance writers, he depicted the life of African Americans in the early twentieth century in his poetry, novels and essays.

Kate Chopin (1851-1904) Is a native St. Louisan best known for her Feminist novel, The Awakening. While her writings drew criticism during her lifetime, since her death she has received critical acclaim and been recognized as avant garde.

T. S. Eliot (1888-1965) is considered By some to be among
Literary Giants/Missouri Mule Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, August 12, 2012
2. Literary Giants/Missouri Mule Marker
the most Influential authors in the early part of the 20th century. He won the 1948 Nobel Prize in Literature. His poems, The Waste Land and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, are studied by thousands of students annually. One of his poems inspired the Broadway hit Cats.

Literary Giants Panel Sponsor: (This panel is currently available for sponsorship. Contact J. Tim Blattner 334-63-27 or L. J. “Freck” Shivelbine 335-8862)

Missouri Mule
The mule is the offspring of a male Donkey and a female horse. Many Missouri farmers with clay soil found mules superior as plow animals. Their unyielding determination to plow forward led to the expression “stubborn as a mule.”

Missouri Mule Panel Sponsors: John, Jerrianne, and Murielle Wyman
 
Erected by Missouri Wall of Fame River Heritage Mural Association.
 
Location. 37° 18.16′ N, 89° 31.079′ W. Marker is in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, in Cape Girardeau County. Marker is on Water Street. Touch for map. Located on Missouri Wall of Fame along the Missouri River Front. Marker is in this post office area: Cape Girardeau MO 63703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1958 (here, next to this marker); Mark Twain /Missouri Generals/ George Caleb Bingham (a few steps from this marker); Visionary Women/Entrepreneurs (a few steps from this marker); 1927 (a few steps from this marker); Captains of Industry (within shouting distance of this marker); 1918-1919 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Civil War/The Boys of Summer (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington Carver (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cape Girardeau.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mississippi River Tales Mural. The Mississippi River Tales is a mural containing 24 panels covering nearly 18,000 square feet (1,700 m2) of the 15-foot (4.6 m)-high downtown floodwall in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. It illustrates the history of the area beginning with the Native Americans who inhabited the area between 900 and 1200. Each panel tells a story: Louis Lorimier platting the city in 1793, the transfer of Upper Louisiana from France to the United States in 1804, Missouri gaining statehood in 1821, the coming of the railroad in 1880, the Big Freeze of 1918-19 and the completion of the Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge, among many others. The paintings are in a style similar to that of painter Thomas Hart Benton. (Pamela Selbert, Chicago Tribune, November 18, 2007). The mural was painted by Chicago artist Thomas Melvin,[1] in collaboration with several local artists, and was dedicated at a public ceremony on July 7, 2005. (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

2.  Laura Ingalls Wilder. Welcome to the official Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Home & Museum website. We hope the history and heritage found here will inspire you to begin making plans to visit this once-in-a-lifetime experience. Each year, more than 30,000 fans from all 50 U.S. states and about 20 countries make their own pilgrimage to visit the famous Rocky Ridge Farm historic homes and museum in Mansfield, Missouri. (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

3. Tennessee Williams Biography.com Playwright(1911–1983). Williams described his childhood in Mississippi as pleasant and happy. But life changed for him when his family moved to St. Louis, Missouri. The carefree nature of his boyhood was stripped in his new urban home, and as a result Williams turned inward and started to write. (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

4. Eugene Field. Field attended several colleges but took no degree; at the University of Missouri he was known less as a student than as a prankster. After his marriage in 1873, Field did editorial work for a variety of newspapers, including the Denver Tribune. From his Tribune column, “Odds and Ends,” he gathered comic paragraphs to form his first book, The Tribune Primer (1882), journalistic joking in the tradition of American humorists Artemus Ward ... (100 of 283 words) (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

5. Langston Hughes. ''I was so sick last night I Didn't hardly know my mind. So sick last night I Didn't know my mind. I drunk some bad licker that Almost made me blind.'' (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

6. Kate Chopin. Her early novel At Fault (1890) was not much noticed, but The Awakening (1899) was widely condemned. Critics called it morbid, vulgar, and disagreeable. Chopinís work was mostly forgotten after her death, but, beginning in the 1950s, scholars rediscovered it and praised it for its truthful depictions of womenís lives. (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

7. T. S. Eliot. Eliot attracted widespread attention for his poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" (1915), which was seen as a masterpiece of the Modernist movement. It was followed by some of the best-known poems in the English language, including The Waste Land (1922), "The Hollow Men" (1925), "Ash Wednesday" (1930), and Four Quartets (1943).[4] He was also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935) and The Cocktail Party (1949). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948, "for his outstanding, pioneer contribution to present-day poetry".[5][6] (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 

8. Missouri's State Animal: The Missouri Mule. The mule comes from a male donkey and a female horse. The mule has many characteristics of the donkey. They are not as fast as horses. (Submitted on September 1, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 31, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 67 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 31, 2017, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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