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Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Kershaw Brigade

 
 
Kershaw Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, August 25, 2008
1. Kershaw Brigade Marker
This marker offers a history of a war monument placed at Gettysburg Battlefield.
Inscription.
Erected by
the City of Greenville, South Carolina
in commemoration of
the "Project Southland" Monument
erected on the
Gettysburg Battlefield honoring
The Kershaw Brigade of South Carolina.
—————
A Greenville Pharmancist, Albert M. Goldstine director of Project Southland in cooperation with the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association, was given the honor and privilege to supervise the erection and unveiling of the "P.S." Monument by the U.S. Department of Interior. (Park Service)

Awards to Project Southland Director
November 21, 1970 - Mayor of Greenville Plaque
November 21, 1970 - Mayor of Abbeville plaque
April 28, 1971 - The Order of the Palmetto
————
Gettysburg Monument - Erected July 23, 1970
Unveiled November 21, 1970
Greenville Monument - Erected January 1973
Unveiled July 2, 1973

 
Erected 1973 by The City of Greenville, South Carolina.
 
Location. 34° 51.319′ N, 82° 23.807′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street and East Elford Street, on the right when traveling
Kershaw Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 27, 2010
2. Kershaw Brigade Marker
north on North Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. In Memory of 81st Wildcat Division / Camp Sevier (a few steps from this marker); SC Ordinance of Secession (a few steps from this marker); Confederate Armory (a few steps from this marker); General Robert E. Lee (within shouting distance of this marker); Greenville County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Eighty Unnamed Soldiers (within shouting distance of this marker); Mrs. James Williams (within shouting distance of this marker); 90 mm M-2 Anti-Aircraft Gun (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); 75 mm Field Gun / 3 inch M1903 (about 700 feet away); Max Heller Legacy Plaza (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kershaw's Report of the Battle of Gettysburg. (Submitted on August 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Kershaw's Brigade. While it is difficult to compare the quality of various units, it is certain that this brigade was among the elite brigades of Lee's army. (Submitted on September 6, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. History of Kershaw's Brigade. ebook provided by Project Guttenberg. (Submitted on September 6, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
General Joseph B. Kershaw<br>1822–1894 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
3. General Joseph B. Kershaw
1822–1894
 

4. Kershaw's Brigade, McLaw's Division. Photos of different Kershaw's Brigade monuments in and around Gettysburg, PA. (Submitted on March 13, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Joseph B. Kershaw. Joseph Brevard Kershaw (January 5, 1822 – April 13, 1894) was a lawyer, judge, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. (Submitted on March 13, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Kershaw Brigade Monument?
The marker states a monument was erected and dedicated in 1970. However, the only monument for any South Carolina troops listed by the National Park service (and other sources) is a state monument placed in 1963.
    — Submitted August 28, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

2. Kershaw's Brigade
Albert Morris Goldstine, a native of Philadelphia, started a one-man effort called Project Southland in 1964. Goldstine's goal was to raise money to purchase the land around the Gettysburg Battlefield for the purpose of preserving the site. Goldstine, who had been a pharmacist in both Abbeville and Greenville, received help from the City of Abbeville and the Greenville Jaycees. He also attracted the interest of the South Carolina legislature. Through Goldstine's efforts, the U.S. Congress learned there were those in the South who were seriously interested in the preservation of the Gettysburg Battlefield. The Gettysburg Battlefield Presentation Association benefited substantially from Goldstine's efforts in spearheading the effort in the South.

On November 21, 1970, Goldstine went to Gettysburg to unveil the marker where General Joseph B. Kershaw's South Carolina Brigade had fought on July 2nd and 3rd, 1863. Also at that ceremony were Dr. Theodore M. Whitfield, president of the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association; George F. Emery. superintendent of Gettysburg National Park; and John Kershaw, a descendant of the general. Whitfield praised Goldstine for his efforts, which played a part in securing federal funds for the eventual purchase of ground on which Confederate soldiers fought and are buried.

In his dedication speech, Goldstine said, "Eventually the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association, with government help, will bring about a shrine in its entirety. And then at long last, these brave men will, literally speaking, lie alongside the Union dead to rest in peace. Goldstine went on to serve on the board of the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association. He considered Project Southland a failure because it failed to raise a meaningful sum of money. In reality, the project was a success in that it attracted attention to the cause the Federal government later adopted. Governor John C. West bestowed upon Goldstine South Carolina's Order of the Palmetto because of his efforts.

The City of Greenville broke ground for this marker in Greenville's Confederate Memorial Park in January 1973 and unveiled it on July 2, 1973. Goldstine spoke at the dedication ceremony. Mayor Max Heller also addressed the group. The marker is a bronze tablet mounted on a four-foot masonry pedestal. Goldstine died on February 8, 1995, and was buried at Long Cane Cemetery near Abbeville. (Source: A Guide to Confederate Monuments in South Carolina: "Passing the Silent Cup" by Robert S. Seigler (1997), pg 363.)
    — Submitted March 13, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 27, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,349 times since then and 120 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 27, 2008, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on March 13, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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