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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Helena in Phillips County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Phillips County Goes to War

 
 
Phillips County Goes to War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2017
1. Phillips County Goes to War Marker
Inscription.
The election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860 broke the nation apart. In May 1861, Arkansas became the ninth state to join the new Confederate States of America.

The Union Army Occupies Helena
By the spring of 1861, most of the men in Helena were gone. Most enlisted in the Confederate army, a few in the Union army. Women left behind ran plantations, farms and businesses, and faced hardships unimaginable in 1860. Just over a year later, the Union army marched into Helena. The Union soldiers never left and the people of Helena and Phillips County lived under an occupation force, their civil liberties curtailed.

The Wealthy Flee
Many who could afford to leave did. Wealthy Confederate sympathizers sent family members and slaves to less vulnerable areas. The Hanks family Quakers who owned Estevan Hall, stayed until 1864 and then sought refuge in Iowa. Others stayed for practical reasons. William F. Allen of the U.S. Sanitary Commission wrote: "Mr. Coolidge [is] now [a] genuine Union man-if for no other reason [than] because [his] interests are now that way."

Helena's Confederate Generals
Seven men from Phillips County became high ranking Confederate officers: Charles Adams, Archibald
A Great Upheaval Marker (on right) at foot of the Mississippi River levee. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2017
2. A Great Upheaval Marker (on right) at foot of the Mississippi River levee.
Dobbins, Daniel C. Govan, Thomas C. Hindman, Lucius Polk and James C. Tappan. General Patrick Cleburne, a shy Irish immigrant, earned the most lasting fame. He was among the Confederacy's best field commanders. Never afraid to take a controversial stance, in 1864 he advocated enlisting slaves into the army in exchange for their freedom.

[Photo captions]
Top right: Dr. Benjamin C. Redford was one of the many men who left Helena for Confederate service.
Bottom left:General Patrick Cleburne, C.S.
The 1st Arkansas Infantry, part of Cleburne's Division, fought in most of the battles in Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee.

 
Erected 2012 by Civil War Helena.
 
Location. 34° 31.348′ N, 90° 35.141′ W. Marker is in Helena, Arkansas, in Phillips County. Marker is on Missouri Street east of Natchez Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Located along Helena Levee Walk near the Helena Train Depot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 65 Missouri Street, Helena AR 72342, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Union Stronghold in Confederate Arkansas (here, next to this marker); A Great Upheaval (here, next to this marker);
A view from the marker towards the Helena Train Depot and the levee. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 26, 2017
3. A view from the marker towards the Helena Train Depot and the levee.
The Battle of Helena (within shouting distance of this marker); They Passed This Way (within shouting distance of this marker); Helena and The Trail of Tears (within shouting distance of this marker); Hernando De Soto (within shouting distance of this marker); KFFA 1360 Helena (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Blues Trail: Mississippi to Helena (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Helena.
 
More about this marker. An Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial site and a part of the Arkansas Civil War Discovery Trail.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Seven Helena General's. image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain
4. Seven Helena General's.
Confederate Generals (L-R): Cleburne, Hindman, Polk, Govan, Tappan, Adams & Dobbins.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 3, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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