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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Daytona Beach in Volusia County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Hall Of Famer

Jackie Robinson

 

—Jackie Robinson Ballpark & Museum —

 
Jackie Robinson Hall Of Famer Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 14, 2017
1. Jackie Robinson Hall Of Famer Marker
Inscription. Jackie Robinson started his major league rookie season at the age of 28 and played 10 seasons from 1947 to 1956. He played in six World Series and is credited with winning the 1955 World Series for the Dodgers. Robinson was named the sport's first Rookie of the Year in 1947 and the award was later renamed the “Jackie Robinson Rookie of the Year Award." He won the National League's batting title and was league’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1949. In his career he played 1,382 games, went to bat 4,877 times, had 947 runs, and 1,518 hits with a batting average of .311. He also stole home 24 times. Jackie Robinson was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962 in his first year of eligibility. The most controversial play at home of all time was Jackie Robinson’s sliding Under Yogi Berra's glove in the 1955 World Series win. Yogi Berra still claims he was "OUT!” Jackie robinson is the only player in the history of Major League Baseball whose number “42" was retired by every single team - an unparalleled honor.
 
Location. 29° 12.585′ N, 81° 1.007′ W. Marker is in Daytona Beach, Florida, in Volusia County. Marker can be reached from East Orange Avenue 0.1 miles east of South Beach Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map.
Jackie Robinson Hall Of Famer Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 14, 2017
2. Jackie Robinson Hall Of Famer Marker
Marker located in Jackie Robinson Ballpark and Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 105 E Orange Ave, Daytona Beach FL 32114, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil Rights Pioneer (here, next to this marker); Wendell Smith And Billy Rowe (here, next to this marker); Mary McLeod Bethune (here, next to this marker); Jackie's First MLB Spring Training Game (here, next to this marker); Rachel Robinson (here, next to this marker); First Spring Training (a few steps from this marker); Jackie And Rachel Robinson Arrive In Daytona Beach (a few steps from this marker); Baseball Legend (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Daytona Beach.
 
More about this marker. This Daytona Beach Ballpark is named in honor of famed major league baseball player Jackie Robinson. In 1946, Daytona Beach was the only city along the spring season circuit to allow Robinson to play. This event helped Robinson to eventually brake the color barrier in major league baseball. On October 22, 1998, this stadium was added to the United States National Register of Historic Places.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsSports
 
Jackie Robinson Ballpark and Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 14, 2017
3. Jackie Robinson Ballpark and Museum Marker
Jackie Robinson Ballpark Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 14, 2017
4. Jackie Robinson Ballpark Entrance
Ariel File Photo Jackie Robinson Ballpark image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross
5. Ariel File Photo Jackie Robinson Ballpark
Radiology Associates Field At Jackie Robinson Ballpark image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, July 14, 2017
6. Radiology Associates Field At Jackie Robinson Ballpark
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2017, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Last updated on September 18, 2017, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 26, 2017, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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