Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Working for the Race

Midcity at the Crossroads

 

—Shaw Heritage Trail —

 
Working for the Race Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
1. Working for the Race Marker
Inscription. Carter G. Woodson, The Father of Black History, worked and lived at 1538 Ninth Street from 1912 until 1950. The son of formerly enslaved people. Woodson received a Ph.D. from Harvard, and became an acclaimed scholar, educator, and advocate. He founded the Association for the Study of Negro (now African American) Life and History and the Associated Publishers and organized Negro History Week (Later Black History Month). He wrote The Mis-Education of American Negro, the landmark textbook The Negro in Our History, and other ground-breaking works. Because he often walked here carrying stacks of books, local schoolchildren dubbed him "bookman."

Poet Langston Hughes briefly worked here for Woodson, and many of his poems captured local working-class African American life. In The Big Sea (1940) he wrote: “I tried to write poems like the songs they sang on Seventh Street.”

The house to your right at 817 Q Street was once the Washington headquarters of the International Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Founded in 1925 by A. Philip Randolph, the IBSCP was the nation's first and largest black trade union. Some 12,000 members — highly skilled porters, attendants, and maids — all worked for the Pullman Palace Car Company. In 1925 Pullman was the nation's largest employer
Working for the Race Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
2. Working for the Race Marker
of African Americans. The IBSCP published The Messenger, battling discrimination practiced by most American labor unions. In 1938 female relatives of union members founded the International Ladies' Auxiliary.

Much of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was planned at 817 Q Street by Randolph, along with Civil Rights activist Bayard Rustin.
 
Erected by Shaw Heritage Trail. (Marker Number 6.)
 
Location. 38° 54.656′ N, 77° 1.431′ W. Marker is in Washington, District of Columbia. Marker is at the intersection of 9th Street Northwest and Q Street Northwest, on the right when traveling north on 9th Street Northwest. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1553 9th Street Northwest, Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Carter G. Woodson House (a few steps from this marker); Phyllis Wheatley YWCA (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Spiritual Life (about 400 feet away); The Fires of 1968 (about 700 feet away); Community Anchors (approx. 0.2 miles away); Like a Village (approx. 0.2 miles away); Grief Turns to Anger (approx. ¼ mile away); Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (approx. ¼ mile away).
 
Categories. African AmericansLabor UnionsNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Carter G. Woodson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
3. Carter G. Woodson
Close-up of photo on marker
Pullman Porter image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
4. Pullman Porter
Close-up of photo on marker
Immaculate Conception Academy image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
5. Immaculate Conception Academy
At 9th and Q streets NW.
Close-up of photo on marker
Historical Association, Sept. 1925 Wash. DC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2017
6. Historical Association, Sept. 1925 Wash. DC
Members of he Association for the Study of Negro Life and History pose in front of the Whitelaw Hotel, 1925. At far right Mary Church Terrell in white, with Carter G. Woodson on her right.
Close-up of photo on reverse of marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 26, 2017. This page originally submitted on September 25, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 25, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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