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Port Henry in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The 1929 Lake Champlain Bridge

 
 
The 1929 Lake Champlain Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 8, 2017
1. The 1929 Lake Champlain Bridge Marker
Inscription.

The first Lake Champlain Bridge between Crown Point, New York, and Chimney Point, Vermont, opened in 1929. Primarily serving tourists when it opened, it ultimately became an important connection for residents and businesses across the region. A testament to modern engineering, the design of the bridge with its high center arch was a perfect melding of form and function.

Charles M. Spofford, the bridge designer, adapted the continuous truss technology used for railroads in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to achieve a structurally efficient and aesthetically pleasing highway bridge. His innovation resulted in a curving transition between the flat approach decks on either side of the bridge and the central channel arch, a shape reminiscent of the mountains that served as the structure's backdrop. The beloved landmark served the region for 80 years until its closing and subsequent demolition due to safety concerns in 2009.

[Photo captions, from left to right, read]
Charles M. Spofford's adaptation of continuous truss technology for the 1929 Crown Point Bridge set a precedent for this new bridge type in the decades that followed.

The 1929 bridge reflected the beauty of its surroundings in its own graceful form.

Spofford's cantilevered design allowed the arched center span to be constructed without

The Lake Champlain Bridges Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 8, 2017
2. The Lake Champlain Bridges Markers
falsework (temporary supports) so that the navigation channel could remain open to boat traffic.

Until its 2009 demolition, residents of Port Henry had excellent views of the 1929 bridge from just about anywhere in the village, and especially from this pier. At night, the lights of the bridge were a reassuring presence across the lake.

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These two signs were prepared as part of a larger program of commemoration to mitigate the loss of the 1929 Lake Champlain Bridge. It was developed in response to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and was funded jointly by the New York State Department of Transportation, the Vermont Agency of Transportation, and the Federal Highway Administration.
 
Erected by NY State Dept of Trans, VT Agency of Trans, and Federal Hwy Admin.
 
Location. 44° 3.049′ N, 73° 27.091′ W. Marker is in Port Henry, New York, in Essex County. Touch for map. Marker is in Powerhouse Park, along the Lake Champlain pier. Marker is in this post office area: Port Henry NY 12974, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The 2011 Lake Champlain Bridge (here, next to this marker); Daisy Godfrey (within shouting distance of this marker); Powerhouse Park (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Teamsters, Dock Wallopers and Child Captains (about 500 feet away); Shore Line (approx. 0.3 miles away); Champlain Academy (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of Porter's and Lewis's Mills (approx. 0.3 miles away); Site of First Blast Furnace (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Henry.
 
Also see . . .
1. The 1929 Lake Champlain (AKA Crown Point) Bridge at Bridgehunters. (Submitted on October 14, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. The story of the [Lake Champlain] bridge. (Submitted on October 14, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Lake Champlain Bridge Project. (Submitted on October 14, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 14, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 14, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 78 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 14, 2017, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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